Page not found – Live, Work & Prosper in Canadahttps://www.africanada.com Live, Work & Prosper in CanadaWed, 16 Sep 2020 16:49:23 +0000en-US hourly 1 https://www.africanada.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/mapleleaf2-45x45.pngPage not found – Live, Work & Prosper in Canadahttps://www.africanada.com 3232Canada invites 4,200 in September 16 Express Entry drawhttps://www.africanada.com/canada-invites-4200-in-september-16-express-entry-draw/ Wed, 16 Sep 2020 16:03:47 +0000https://www.africanada.com/?p=56711Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has invited a total of 4,200 candidates to apply for Canadian permanent residence in the latest Express Entry draw held September 16, 2020. The minimum Comprehensive Ranking Score (CRS) for the September 16 draw was 472 points – three points lower than the September 02 draw of 475 points. This is the fourth all-program draw since March 18, as the coronavirus pandemic affected draw schedules. IRCC is continuing to hold regularly scheduled Express Entry rounds of invitations after putting special measures in place to contain the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. We expect that despite the ongoing pandemic, Canada’s government will hit its immigration targets for 2020. The draw brings the total number of ITAs issued this year to 74,150. The Express Entry immigration selection system In order to enter the federal Express Entry pool, candidates must first meet the eligibility requirements for one of the three programs: the Federal Skilled Worker Class; the Federal Skilled Trades Class; and the Canadian Experience Class. You also must first create an Express Entry profile. A job offer is not required to enter or be selected from the Express Entry pool although additional CRS points are awarded to those who already have a job. A certain number of the highest-ranked candidates who have submitted their profiles into the pool are issued Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for Canadian permanent residence through regular draws which typically take place every two weeks. A candidate’s CRS score is based on factors such as age, education, skilled work experience and proficiency in English or French. Based on your personal information you will be given a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score. Your CRS is a numerical value, out of a possible 1,200, determined by your core human capital. This is essentially your age, work experience, educational background, ability to adapt and language skills. Once your profile has been completed and your CRS has been calculated, you will be placed into a pool of candidates ranked by their CRS score. Find out if you are eligible to enter the Express Entry pool. The Canadian federal government and the provincial and territorial governments regularly draws candidates from this pool to issue ITAs based on particular needs and shortages in the country or provinces. Once you have created your profile under the federal Express Entry system, you may receive an invitation to apply for permanent residence through the federal government, or you may receive an invitation to apply for a provincial nomination. Under the Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs), Canada’s provincial and territorial governments are able to nominate individuals to reside in the province/territory as permanent residents in order to meet their economic needs.  Candidates with the highest CRS scores get issued ITAs first. So once your CRS score meets the minimum cut-off point for a particular draw you will be issued an ITA. Candidates with scores below the latest cut-off can improve their CRS scoring in a number of ways, particularly if they enroll in any of the provincial nomination programs that have Express Entry component. Express Entry candidates with a provincial nomination receive an additional 600 CRS points. If their provincial nomination is approved, the invited candidates will be issued an additional 600 Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) points. The additional points place them in a favorable position to receive a federal Invitation to Apply (ITA) for Canadian permanent residence in a future IRCC) draws. Top questions about Express Entry profiles What do I do if I lost my GCKey username or password? What do you mean by Primary Occupation? What is a personal reference code for Express Entry? Where can I get a one? My personal reference code is not working. What should I do? Where can I find my Express Entry profile number and/or Job Seeker validation code? How do I find my National Occupation Classification (NOC) code? See all questions about Express Entry draws

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Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) has invited a total of 4,200 candidates to apply for Canadian permanent residence in the latest Express Entry draw held September 16, 2020. The minimum Comprehensive Ranking Score (CRS) for the September 16 draw was 472 points – three points lower than the September 02 draw of 475 points. This is the fourth all-program draw since March 18, as the coronavirus pandemic affected draw schedules.

IRCC is continuing to hold regularly scheduled Express Entry rounds of invitations after putting special measures in place to contain the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. We expect that despite the ongoing pandemic, Canada’s government will hit its immigration targets for 2020. The draw brings the total number of ITAs issued this year to 74,150.

The Express Entry immigration selection system

In order to enter the federal Express Entry pool, candidates must first meet the eligibility requirements for one of the three programs: the Federal Skilled Worker Class; the Federal Skilled Trades Class; and the Canadian Experience Class. You also must first create an Express Entry profile. A job offer is not required to enter or be selected from the Express Entry pool although additional CRS points are awarded to those who already have a job.

september 16 express entry

A certain number of the highest-ranked candidates who have submitted their profiles into the pool are issued Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for Canadian permanent residence through regular draws which typically take place every two weeks. A candidate’s CRS score is based on factors such as age, education, skilled work experience and proficiency in English or French.

Based on your personal information you will be given a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score. Your CRS is a numerical value, out of a possible 1,200, determined by your core human capital. This is essentially your age, work experience, educational background, ability to adapt and language skills.

Once your profile has been completed and your CRS has been calculated, you will be placed into a pool of candidates ranked by their CRS score. Find out if you are eligible to enter the Express Entry pool. The Canadian federal government and the provincial and territorial governments regularly draws candidates from this pool to issue ITAs based on particular needs and shortages in the country or provinces.

Once you have created your profile under the federal Express Entry system, you may receive an invitation to apply for permanent residence through the federal government, or you may receive an invitation to apply for a provincial nomination. Under the Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs), Canada’s provincial and territorial governments are able to nominate individuals to reside in the province/territory as permanent residents in order to meet their economic needs. 

Candidates with the highest CRS scores get issued ITAs first. So once your CRS score meets the minimum cut-off point for a particular draw you will be issued an ITA.

Candidates with scores below the latest cut-off can improve their CRS scoring in a number of ways, particularly if they enroll in any of the provincial nomination programs that have Express Entry component. Express Entry candidates with a provincial nomination receive an additional 600 CRS points. If their provincial nomination is approved, the invited candidates will be issued an additional 600 Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) points. The additional points place them in a favorable position to receive a federal Invitation to Apply (ITA) for Canadian permanent residence in a future IRCC) draws.

Top questions about Express Entry profiles

See all questions about Express Entry draws

The post Canada invites 4,200 in September 16 Express Entry draw appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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How to immigrate to Canada from Moroccohttps://www.africanada.com/how-to-immigrate-to-canada-from-morocco/ Wed, 16 Sep 2020 15:17:19 +0000https://www.africanada.com/?p=56703This article summarizes the Canadian programs available to people who want to immigrate to Canada from Morocco and the steps to take to achieve your goal.  Morocco is a top country source of immigrants to Canada. Morocco ranked 5th source country of new permanent residency issued in July 2020. En 2016, la diaspora marocaine au Canada se chiffrait à plus de 104 000 personnes, notamment dans la région de Montréal. Le Maroc est aussi la troisième source d’immigrants au Québec. Chaque année, près de 3500 jeunes Marocains se rendent au Canada pour étudier dans des collèges et des universités, traditionnellement en destination du Québec, mais récemment de manière accrue vers les autres provinces et les territoires. Canada’s 2016 census estimated the number of Moroccans in Canada at 104,000 people, most of whom reside in the Montreal area of the province of Quebec. Morocco is also the third largest source of immigrants to Quebec. Every year, close to 3,500 young Moroccans come to study in Canadian colleges and universities, traditionally in Quebec, but increasingly in other provinces and territories. In addition to long-term partnership with Canada through La Francophonie, Morocco has emerged in recent years as an important Canada ally in the efforts to counter terrorism and violent extremism. Since September 2019, the two countries have co-chaired the Global Forum against Terrorism (GCTF) for the period 2019-2021. See Relations Canada – Maroc. Pathways to immigrate to Canada from Morocco There are several pathways for Moroccans to immigrate to Canada. For example you may immigrate as a skilled worker, as a student, or be sponsored by a family member who is a Canadian permanent resident or citizen. Depending on your qualifications, you may be eligible to immigrate under one of the following categories: Federal Skilled Worker Program Federal Skilled Trades Class Program Quebec Skilled Worker Program Provincial Nominee Programs Canadian Experience Class Quebec Experience Class Federal Self-Employed Program Canada also offers a number of Family Class Sponsorship programs. These programs allow Canadian citizens and permanent residents to sponsor their Moroccan family members and loved ones for Canadian immigration. What are the best options to immigrate to Canada from Morocco? Later in this post we provide you the step-by-step instructions to apply for a Canadian immigration program of your choice. Before then, let us briefly describe several of the ways you can immigrate to Canada from Morocco. 1. Skilled Worker path Moroccan skilled workers who choose to immigrate to Canada may apply for permanent residency under the federal Express Entry program. The Express Entry system allows Canada to actively recruit, assess and select skilled immigrants under the three Federal High Skilled economic-class immigration programs: the Federal Skilled Worker Class; the Federal Skilled Trades Class; and the Canadian Experience Class. In order to enter the federal Express Entry pool, candidates must first create an Express Entry profile. A job offer is not required to enter or be selected from the Express Entry pool. A certain number of the highest-ranked candidates who have submitted their profiles into the pool are issued Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for Canadian permanent residence through regular draws which typically take place every two weeks. A candidate’s CRS score is based on factors such as age, education, skilled work experience and proficiency in English or French. Based on your personal information you will be given a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score. Your CRS is a numerical value, out of a possible 1,200, determined by your core human capital. This is essentially your age, work experience, educational background, ability to adapt and language skills (see we told you your IELTS and TEF scores are important!). Once your profile has been completed and your CRS has been calculated, you will be placed into a pool of candidates ranked by their CRS score. The Canadian government regularly draws candidates from this pool to issue ITAs based on particular needs and shortages in the country. Candidates with the highest CRS scores get issued ITAs first. So once your CRS score meets the minimum cut-off point for a particular draw you will be issued an ITA. See for example 3400 Express Entry candidates invited for Canada PR. Basic steps to immigrate to Canada from Morocco 2. Student Visa path Moroccan students who have applied for and been accepted into a Designated Learning Institution (DLI) may apply for a Canadian Student Visa to come to Canada for the program to which they have been accepted. To be eligible you must meet the following requirements: You must have been accepted by a Designated Learning Institution (DLI) in Canada. You must prove that you have enough money to pay for your: tuition fees living expenses for yourself and any family members who come with you to Canada and return transportation for yourself and any family members who come with you to Canada. You must be a law-abiding citizen with no criminal record and not be a risk to the security of Canada. You may have to provide a police certificate. You must be in good health and willing to complete a medical examination, if necessary. You must satisfy an immigration officer that you will leave Canada at the end of your authorized stay. You must have received an acceptance letter from the designated institution before you submit your application for a Canadian student visa. For step-by-step guides to applying for admission and study visa, read Canada Study Permit – Step-by-Step Guides. See also  Find Universities in Canada and Find Canada Scholarships. NOTE: An Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) is required to apply for certain Canada immigration programs. World Education Services (WES) is designated by Canada to provide ECAs for degrees and diplomas earned outside of Canada. See more information on WES Canada – ECA. 3. Family Sponsorship path Moroccans who have family members that are already Canadian citizens or permanent residents may be sponsored by relatives to immigrate to Canada from Morocco. If you have a friend or close relative in Canada, you might be able to obtain Canadian permanent residence under the federal Family Class program. As well you will get points from the Provincial Nominee Program available in the province where they are resident. Relatives in Canada You, or your spouse or common-law partner, have a relative who is: living in Canada 18 years or older and a Canadian citizen or permanent resident This relative must be a: parent grandparent child grandchild your or your spouse’s sibling (child of your or your spouse’s parent) your or your spouse’s aunt or uncle (by blood or marriage) your or your spouse’s niece or nephew (grandchild of your or your spouse’s parent) 4. Provincial Nominee Programs Another pathway that is very popular are the Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs).  Under the PNPs, Canada’s provincial and territorial governments are able to nominate individuals to reside in the province/territory as permanent residents in order to meet their economic needs.  Once you have created your profile under the federal Express Entry system, you may receive an invitation to apply for permanent residence through the federal government, or you may receive an invitation to apply for a provincial nomination. 5. Have you previously studied or worked in Canada or doing so now? Moroccans who have previously worked/studied, or are currently working/studying, in Canada have a path to becoming Canadian permanent residents via the Canadian Experience Class and Quebec Experience Class programs. You get points if you or your spouse/partner completed at least 2 academic years of full-time study (in a program at least 2 years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada. Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week. You must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time. You also get points for working in Canada if you did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada: In a job listed in Skill Type 0 or Skill Levels A or B of the National Occupational Classification (NOC). And, with a valid work permit, or while authorized to work in Canada. You may receive additional points if your spouse or partner did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada on a valid work permit or while authorized to work in Canada. 6. Do you have a high net worth or significant financial resources? The federal and Quebec governments operate a number of business investor and entrepreneur immigration programs that offer excellent opportunities to Moroccan citizens for obtaining Canadian permanent resident status. In addition many provinces offer business or investment streams under their Provincial Nominee Programs that are available to Filipinos. Some of the popular ones include Canada Start-up Visa Program and Quebec Immigrant Investor Program. 7. Do you own and/or manage a business? Your business ownership or managerial experience may enhance your eligibility for federal and provincial governments business investor and entrepreneur immigration programs. Start your free assessment today. You just may have the qualifications for many of these programs. Step-by-step guides to immigrate to Canada from Morocco In the following sections we have simplified for you the steps that you need to take to immigrate to Canada from Morocco using a 10-step guide. Follow the basic steps below to get started. Step 1 Choose where you want to live in Canada; Step 2 Research for the best Canada immigration program; Step 3 Pass basic Canada immigration requirements to apply for your visa; Step 4 Get your documents ready; Step 5 Take Canada immigration language exams; Step 6 Find your NOC job (if applicable); Step 7 Complete a medical exam with accepted medical professionals; Step 8 Get a police clearance certificate; Step 9 Complete Canada immigration Biometrics; and Step 10 Apply for professional Canada immigration and visa assistance Step 1 – Where to Live in Canada It is important to research about the best places to live in Canada based on your personal needs. For instance, you need to determine if you want to move to a family friendly province known for the best education systems and daycare programs in the country or if you want to move to a Canadian province with best economic factors like jobs. As described earlier in Part 4 Canadian provinces also have their own immigration programs (PNPs) that are designed to address their own unique human labor needs. Some provinces focus on foreign IT workers while others focus on healthcare workers. Getting nominated under any one of these programs increases your chances of becoming a Canadian permanent resident. See Canada’s Provincial Nominee Programs (PNP). Other factors to consider include cost of living in the province, housing and healthcare. The province of Quebec is primarily French-speaking and offers its own immigration program that is tailored for candidates with high French-language proficiency. Some PNPs also target French-speaking applicants, for example Ontario and Nova Scotia PNPs. Step 2 – Research Immigration Programs There are some 100 Canada immigration programs in multiple categories and sub-categories. Each program, category and sub-category has its own unique requirements that you need to meet before you should think about applying. The first step in making your research productive is to be clear about why you want to immigrate to Canada. Ask yourself the following questions. Do you want to come to Canada for work, to be reunited with your family, to study as an international student, to get access to a better lifestyle or any combination of these? In the previous sections, we have described many of the pathways, including international student visa, skilled worker and family sponsorship. Step 3 – Pass General Eligibility Requirements Here are just a few of the requirements common to all Canada immigration programs: Your NOC (National Occupational Classification) code and level Individuals applying for any of the over 100 Canadian immigration programs often ask “what is the NOC”? The National Occupational Classification (NOC) is Canada’s national system developed to define and classify jobs. Many of Canada’s immigration programs use the NOC system to determine if a job or work experience is relevant according to the criteria of the program.  It can help you locate information about occupations found throughout Canada’s job market. You can use the NOC to research: job descriptions educational requirements required skills related occupations As well, the NOC is often used by employers to help them write job descriptions and identify skill requirements for new job postings. The NOC is also...

The post How to immigrate to Canada from Morocco appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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This article summarizes the Canadian programs available to people who want to immigrate to Canada from Morocco and the steps to take to achieve your goal.  Morocco is a top country source of immigrants to Canada. Morocco ranked 5th source country of new permanent residency issued in July 2020.

En 2016, la diaspora marocaine au Canada se chiffrait à plus de 104 000 personnes, notamment dans la région de Montréal. Le Maroc est aussi la troisième source d’immigrants au Québec. Chaque année, près de 3500 jeunes Marocains se rendent au Canada pour étudier dans des collèges et des universités, traditionnellement en destination du Québec, mais récemment de manière accrue vers les autres provinces et les territoires.

Canada’s 2016 census estimated the number of Moroccans in Canada at 104,000 people, most of whom reside in the Montreal area of the province of Quebec. Morocco is also the third largest source of immigrants to Quebec. Every year, close to 3,500 young Moroccans come to study in Canadian colleges and universities, traditionally in Quebec, but increasingly in other provinces and territories.

In addition to long-term partnership with Canada through La Francophonie, Morocco has emerged in recent years as an important Canada ally in the efforts to counter terrorism and violent extremism. Since September 2019, the two countries have co-chaired the Global Forum against Terrorism (GCTF) for the period 2019-2021. See Relations Canada – Maroc.

Pathways to immigrate to Canada from Morocco

There are several pathways for Moroccans to immigrate to Canada. For example you may immigrate as a skilled worker, as a student, or be sponsored by a family member who is a Canadian permanent resident or citizen.

Depending on your qualifications, you may be eligible to immigrate under one of the following categories:

Canada also offers a number of Family Class Sponsorship programs. These programs allow Canadian citizens and permanent residents to sponsor their Moroccan family members and loved ones for Canadian immigration.

What are the best options to immigrate to Canada from Morocco?

Later in this post we provide you the step-by-step instructions to apply for a Canadian immigration program of your choice. Before then, let us briefly describe several of the ways you can immigrate to Canada from Morocco.

1. Skilled Worker path

Moroccan skilled workers who choose to immigrate to Canada may apply for permanent residency under the federal Express Entry program. The Express Entry system allows Canada to actively recruit, assess and select skilled immigrants under the three Federal High Skilled economic-class immigration programs: the Federal Skilled Worker Class; the Federal Skilled Trades Class; and the Canadian Experience Class.

In order to enter the federal Express Entry pool, candidates must first create an Express Entry profile. A job offer is not required to enter or be selected from the Express Entry pool. A certain number of the highest-ranked candidates who have submitted their profiles into the pool are issued Invitations to Apply (ITAs) for Canadian permanent residence through regular draws which typically take place every two weeks. A candidate’s CRS score is based on factors such as age, education, skilled work experience and proficiency in English or French.

Based on your personal information you will be given a Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) score. Your CRS is a numerical value, out of a possible 1,200, determined by your core human capital. This is essentially your age, work experience, educational background, ability to adapt and language skills (see we told you your IELTS and TEF scores are important!).

Once your profile has been completed and your CRS has been calculated, you will be placed into a pool of candidates ranked by their CRS score. The Canadian government regularly draws candidates from this pool to issue ITAs based on particular needs and shortages in the country. Candidates with the highest CRS scores get issued ITAs first. So once your CRS score meets the minimum cut-off point for a particular draw you will be issued an ITA. See for example 3400 Express Entry candidates invited for Canada PR.

Basic steps to immigrate to Canada from Morocco

immigrate to canada from morocco

2. Student Visa path

Moroccan students who have applied for and been accepted into a Designated Learning Institution (DLI) may apply for a Canadian Student Visa to come to Canada for the program to which they have been accepted. To be eligible you must meet the following requirements:

  • You must have been accepted by a Designated Learning Institution (DLI) in Canada.
  • You must prove that you have enough money to pay for your:
    • tuition fees
    • living expenses for yourself and any family members who come with you to Canada and
    • return transportation for yourself and any family members who come with you to Canada.
  • You must be a law-abiding citizen with no criminal record and not be a risk to the security of Canada. You may have to provide a police certificate.
  • You must be in good health and willing to complete a medical examination, if necessary.
  • You must satisfy an immigration officer that you will leave Canada at the end of your authorized stay.

You must have received an acceptance letter from the designated institution before you submit your application for a Canadian student visa.

For step-by-step guides to applying for admission and study visa, read Canada Study Permit – Step-by-Step Guides. See also  Find Universities in Canada and Find Canada Scholarships.

NOTE: An Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) is required to apply for certain Canada immigration programs. World Education Services (WES) is designated by Canada to provide ECAs for degrees and diplomas earned outside of Canada. See more information on WES Canada – ECA.

3. Family Sponsorship path

Moroccans who have family members that are already Canadian citizens or permanent residents may be sponsored by relatives to immigrate to Canada from Morocco. If you have a friend or close relative in Canada, you might be able to obtain Canadian permanent residence under the federal Family Class program. As well you will get points from the Provincial Nominee Program available in the province where they are resident.

Relatives in Canada

You, or your spouse or common-law partner, have a relative who is:

  • living in Canada
  • 18 years or older and
  • a Canadian citizen or permanent resident

This relative must be a:

  • parent
  • grandparent
  • child
  • grandchild
  • your or your spouse’s sibling (child of your or your spouse’s parent)
  • your or your spouse’s aunt or uncle (by blood or marriage)
  • your or your spouse’s niece or nephew (grandchild of your or your spouse’s parent)

4. Provincial Nominee Programs

Another pathway that is very popular are the Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs).  Under the PNPs, Canada’s provincial and territorial governments are able to nominate individuals to reside in the province/territory as permanent residents in order to meet their economic needs. 

Once you have created your profile under the federal Express Entry system, you may receive an invitation to apply for permanent residence through the federal government, or you may receive an invitation to apply for a provincial nomination.

5. Have you previously studied or worked in Canada or doing so now?

Moroccans who have previously worked/studied, or are currently working/studying, in Canada have a path to becoming Canadian permanent residents via the Canadian Experience Class and Quebec Experience Class programs.

You get points if you or your spouse/partner completed at least 2 academic years of full-time study (in a program at least 2 years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada. Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week. You must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time.

You also get points for working in Canada if you did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada:

  1. In a job listed in Skill Type 0 or Skill Levels A or B of the National Occupational Classification (NOC).
  2. And, with a valid work permit, or while authorized to work in Canada.

You may receive additional points if your spouse or partner did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada on a valid work permit or while authorized to work in Canada.

6. Do you have a high net worth or significant financial resources?

The federal and Quebec governments operate a number of business investor and entrepreneur immigration programs that offer excellent opportunities to Moroccan citizens for obtaining Canadian permanent resident status. In addition many provinces offer business or investment streams under their Provincial Nominee Programs that are available to Filipinos. Some of the popular ones include Canada Start-up Visa Program and Quebec Immigrant Investor Program.

7. Do you own and/or manage a business?

Your business ownership or managerial experience may enhance your eligibility for federal and provincial governments business investor and entrepreneur immigration programs. Start your free assessment today. You just may have the qualifications for many of these programs.

Step-by-step guides to immigrate to Canada from Morocco

immigrate to canada from morocco

In the following sections we have simplified for you the steps that you need to take to immigrate to Canada from Morocco using a 10-step guide. Follow the basic steps below to get started.

  • Step 1 Choose where you want to live in Canada;
  • Step 2 Research for the best Canada immigration program;
  • Step 3 Pass basic Canada immigration requirements to apply for your visa;
  • Step 4 Get your documents ready;
  • Step 5 Take Canada immigration language exams;
  • Step 6 Find your NOC job (if applicable);
  • Step 7 Complete a medical exam with accepted medical professionals;
  • Step 8 Get a police clearance certificate;
  • Step 9 Complete Canada immigration Biometrics; and
  • Step 10 Apply for professional Canada immigration and visa assistance

Step 1 – Where to Live in Canada

immigrate to canada from lebanon

It is important to research about the best places to live in Canada based on your personal needs. For instance, you need to determine if you want to move to a family friendly province known for the best education systems and daycare programs in the country or if you want to move to a Canadian province with best economic factors like jobs.

As described earlier in Part 4 Canadian provinces also have their own immigration programs (PNPs) that are designed to address their own unique human labor needs. Some provinces focus on foreign IT workers while others focus on healthcare workers. Getting nominated under any one of these programs increases your chances of becoming a Canadian permanent resident. See Canada’s Provincial Nominee Programs (PNP).

Other factors to consider include cost of living in the province, housing and healthcare.

The province of Quebec is primarily French-speaking and offers its own immigration program that is tailored for candidates with high French-language proficiency. Some PNPs also target French-speaking applicants, for example Ontario and Nova Scotia PNPs.

Step 2 – Research Immigration Programs

immigrate to canada from morocco

There are some 100 Canada immigration programs in multiple categories and sub-categories. Each program, category and sub-category has its own unique requirements that you need to meet before you should think about applying.

The first step in making your research productive is to be clear about why you want to immigrate to Canada. Ask yourself the following questions. Do you want to come to Canada for work, to be reunited with your family, to study as an international student, to get access to a better lifestyle or any combination of these? In the previous sections, we have described many of the pathways, including international student visa, skilled worker and family sponsorship.

Step 3 – Pass General Eligibility Requirements

immigrate to canada from morocco

Here are just a few of the requirements common to all Canada immigration programs:

Your NOC (National Occupational Classification) code and level

Individuals applying for any of the over 100 Canadian immigration programs often ask “what is the NOC”? The National Occupational Classification (NOC) is Canada’s national system developed to define and classify jobs. Many of Canada’s immigration programs use the NOC system to determine if a job or work experience is relevant according to the criteria of the program.  It can help you locate information about occupations found throughout Canada’s job market. You can use the NOC to research:

  • job descriptions
  • educational requirements
  • required skills
  • related occupations

As well, the NOC is often used by employers to help them write job descriptions and identify skill requirements for new job postings.

The NOC is also used by many government agencies (including Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada) to identify skills shortages in the Canadian job market.

Canada breaks up job levels into 0, A, B, C, D and E. Your occupation is also categorized by a four digit code, for example, Henry is a plumber and under Canada’s NOC level he is categorized as level B and his four digit code is 7251.

Work experience 

Many Canada immigration programs require that you have at least one year of work experience.

Proficiency in Canada languages – French or English

Virtually all of Canada immigration programs require that you demonstrate the ability to communicate in either English or French language through official tests. The International English Language Testing System or IELTS is one of the English language tests approved by the government of Canada for this purpose, while TEF (Test d’evaluation Francais) is approved for French.

Express Entry candidates can get up to 30 bonus points for speaking both English and French, even if French is your second language.

Police background clearance

You must get a police clearance certificate if you’re applying for permanent residence or Canadian citizenship. You might need a police certificate if you’re coming to Canada as a:

  • tourist
  • student
  • temporary worker
  • live-in caregiver

Find out more about police certificates and where to get a police certificate depending on where you live.

Health clearance and medical exams

You may need to have a medical exam. This is to:

  • protect the health and safety of Canadians
  • prevent burdens on Canada’s health and social services system.

Find out more about medical exams.

Step 4 – Gather all Important Documents

Failure to include ALL the documents required for the Canada immigration program that you have applied to will result in rejection or delay of your application. The documents you need depend on the visa you apply for.

Here is a basic list of documents required for most Canada immigration programs:
ID, passport or birth certificate;
Medical exam results that are not older than a year;
IELTS and TEF exam results that are not older than two years;
Biometric records;
Police clearance certificate; and an
ECA (Educational Credential Assessment)

Of course there are several additional document requirements depending on the program. For example, you need these documents to apply for a study permit:

You may also need

Step 5 – Complete IELTS and TEF Exams

As indicated in Step 3 above, language skills in French and English are a key requirement in virtually all Canada immigration programs. Canada needs you to prove that you can adapt, communicate and use local languages to communicate with your community and the people you work with.

Both the IELTS and TEF test your ability in speaking, listening, writing and reading. IELTS exams are normally 2 hours and 45 minutes long, while the TEF is just 10 minutes longer.

It is important for all candidates who intend to immigrate to Canada from Morocco to acquire high language proficiency and attain the highest language scores possible. This will increase your overall ranking scores on the CRS points system and thus your chances to immigrate to Canada.

English or French language skills are very important to help you settle in Canada. While you are better off with both, you may choose to focus on learning or improving one or the other depending on where you plan to settle in Canada.

If you already speak either English or French, it is advantageous to take the time to learn the other. In many parts of Canada, being able to speak both is an advantage for finding a job and taking part in your community. See Language Portal of Canada for tools and resources to improve your language skills.

Strong English or French skills will help with:

  • getting a job
  • going to school
  • accessing services
  • helping your children with school work
  • meeting and talking to people
  • getting your Canadian citizenship

To find information about other language training programs funded by the provinces or territories:

When you get your results back, you must make sure that your scores are translated into a score system called the Canadian Language Benchmark for your IELTS. Your TEF results will be translated to another score system called the NCLC (Niveau de compétence linguistique canadien).

… and Get Your Credentials Assessed

Your educational background is essential information for your Canadian immigration application. For this reason, you need to get all of your certificates, degrees, diplomas, licenses and qualifications verified by accredited organisations to prove that they meet Canadian standards. Remember, this is only for qualifications you received from outside of Canada, so if you graduated from a Canadian institution, you do not need to have those documents verified.

YOU CAN GET YOUR EDUCATIONAL CREDENTIAL ASSESSMENT (ECA) DONE HERE:
WES – World Education Services
ICAS – International Credential Assessment Service
IQAS – International Qualifications Assessment Service
ICES – International Credential Evaluation Service

Remember, your ECA is only valid for 5 years, so plan your application wisely. Also, don’t forget that you must use your original transcripts for the assessment.

Step 6 – Find Your NOC Canada Level and Code

As described earlier, your NOC level and code are crucial for ascertaining which Canada immigration programs you can apply for. Finding your NOC code is very easy and fast through the government of Canada’s website at Find Your NOC. Once on the page, you will see a drop down form with options to enter in your occupation on a small search console like the one below.

immigrate to canada from morocco

You can then find the NOC code and level for your job, for example, if you are a plumber, your level is B and NOC code is 7251.

Step 7 – Do Your Medical Examination

A complete medical examination is required for all Canada immigration programs that involve staying in Canada for more than six months.

NOTE: A medical exam cannot be performed by any doctor. Medical exams will only be accepted if they are completed by a doctor who belongs in Canada approved Panel Physicians.

You should also make sure to bring the following with to your medical exam.

  • ID or other formal means to identify yourself (Driver’s licence, passport etc);
  • Any medical reports for pre-existing medical conditions;
  • Medical reports for IMM 1017E; and
  • 4 passport size photos of yourself

The panel physician doesn’t make the final decision about your medical exam. IRCC makes that decision. If there’s a problem with your medical exam, IRCC contact you in writing.

Step 8 – Get a Police Clearance Certificate in the Morocco

To immigrate to Canada from Morocco you must have a clear criminal record check. To demonstrate this, IRCC requires that you submit a police certificate.

If you are a citizen of Morocco:

A. If you live in Morocco:

You must apply in person at your local police station or you can nominate a representative to apply on your behalf, but they must bring your national identity card when they apply.

B. If you live outside of Morocco:

You can apply at your nearest Moroccan embassy or consulate or by proxy to the local police station (not Service central des casiers judiciaires at Place de la Mamounia in Rabat)

To apply by proxy, you must provide the following documents:

  • A notarized proxy
  • A photocopy of your birth certificate
  • A photocopy of the first page of your passport
  • A photocopy of the page of your passport that shows the date of your most recent entry into Morocco
  • Applicable fees

If you are not a citizen of Morocco:

A. If you live in Morocco:

You can apply at the Service central des casiers judiciaires at Place de la Mamounia in Rabat. You must bring:

  • Your national identity card or photocopies of your passport and birth certificate
  • Information about your stay, your employment and your residence in Morocco
  • Applicable fees

B. If you live outside of Morocco:

You must send your application to the diplomatic or consular mission of your country of origin that is accredited in Morocco. The mission of your country will then send your application to the concerned Moroccan authorities (Ministry of Justice or the Court of First Instance if you are born in Morocco).

Information and documents you need:

Special notes and considerations

For more information, visit the O-Maroc website (available in French only).

Official website of the Ministry of Justice (available in Arabic only).

Certificates are given directly to applicants. No translation is needed as the document is written in both French and Arabic.

Moroccan nationals can also obtain “Bulletin No 3” form the Court of 1st Instance in their city of residence but it is not accepted for immigration purposes as it is not global and includes only offences committed in the city of residence.

Step 9 – Apply for Biometrics

Effective July 31, 2018 Canadian immigration law requires that international students and graduates from Europe, the Middle East and Africa must submit their biometrics (fingerprints and a facial recognition photo) with their applications for visitor, study, and work visa, and for permanent resident status in Canada. Applicants from Asia, Asia Pacific and the America will be required to provide Biometrics identification starting December 31, 2018.

Biometric verification will be required from non-exempt applicants once every 10 years.

Canada biometrics requirements help the government to prevent identify fraud/theft, entry of criminals, re-entry of deportees and false identity claims. The Government of Canada reassures that biometrics information is handled with the highest level of security and privacy. On their webiste, IRCC states that all biometrics data collected at a service point is deleted once it has been sent to the Canadian Immigration Biometrics Identification System, where they will be checked by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP).

The process of giving biometrics is fast and secure. It may take only a few minutes to complete when done at a Visa Application Centre (VAC) or authorized service point.

Biometric data should not be provided before an application is submitted. Bometric details should be given after an application is submitted, fees are paid and a biometric instruction letter is obtained. Alternatively, you can submit your biometric data at the same time you submit your application at a Visa Application Centre (VAC).

Biometrics Centers

To support the expansion of its biometrics program, Canada is opening new Visa Application Centres in countries where biometrics collection demand will grow. There are currently 137 VACs worldwide that provide biometric collection. If you are in the U.S., you can go to any of 135 Application Support Centers.

You must give your biometrics in person. You need to make an appointment to give your biometrics.

Find a Biometrics collection point close to you.

Step 10 – Use a Canada immigration lawyer or agent

As you can see from this post, the Canadian immigration system, the laws and the policies involved are complicated, technical and frequently changing. Errors can have devastating and costly consequences for applicants, delaying your process or even causing rejected claims.

Canadian immigration lawyers and agents have the education, training and experience required to navigate these complexities for those wishing to immigrate to Canada from the Philippines. They also know how to get you through the process right the first time, with the most up-to-date legal knowledge. You can visit Find Canada Immigration Lawyers.

If you decide to use an immigration lawyer or agent for your application, you want to make sure of their capability and ethics.  A good immigration lawyer or agent can make all the difference to your application.  Read our “dos” and “don’ts” to ensure you get ethical lawyers and agents and avoid scammers: Avoid Immigration Fraud and Scam; and Finding a Good Canada Immigration Lawyer.

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Is Canada spousal sponsorship in crisis due to COVID-19?https://www.africanada.com/is-canada-spousal-sponsorship-in-crisis-due-to-covid-19/ Sun, 13 Sep 2020 23:13:38 +0000https://www.africanada.com/?p=56694Like other countries around the world, Canada spousal sponsorship process is under a lot of pressure during these COVID-19 times. The Canadian government is committed, and has always made consistent efforts, to ensure that immigrant families are able to stay together. The standard processing time for most family sponsorship applications has been streamlined to 12 months prior to the coronavirus pandemic. Canada’s Family Class Sponsorship programs are some of the most generous family reunification programs in the developed world. One of the most widely used Family Class streams is the Canada Spousal Sponsorship stream, which facilitates immigration for spouses and common-law partners of Canadian citizens and permanent residents. Canada Immigration Levels Plan: Family Reunification 2018 2019 2020 Spouses, Partners, and Children 66,000 68,000 70,000 Parents and Grandparents 20,000 20,500 21,000 Total Family 86,000 88,500 91,000 Source: IRCC Unfortunately the coronavirus pandemic has upended Canada Spousal Sponsorship stream processes, processing and support services, just like the pandemic has on other immigration programs including students visa, work permit and visiting visa processes. The pandemic has worsened a situation in which families already feel that Temporary Resident Visas (TRV) to visit spouses and families are often denied because applicants have to demonstrate that they would leave Canada at the end of their authorized stay if their permanent residence application is not finalized. There are countless post-Covid-19 Canada spousal sponsorship horror stories on social media, including the Facebook account of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) The common thread of each story is how family unit has become disrupted as a result of the spousal sponsorship delays consequent to the coronavirus pandemic. See for example Canadian Spousal Sponsorship Applicants Affected by Covid-19. Moreover, most express dismay that they had received no update or communication from IRCC on the status of their applications since February 2020. What is IRCC doing to alleviate spousal sponsorship delays? This is the utmost question on the minds of couples and families affected by the spousal sponsorship delays. The government’s website candidly states that due to the impacts of the coronavirus it is unable to process applications normally or provide accurate processing times.  Understandably, Canadians who have been separated from their foreign national loved ones for an extended period of time are mounting pressure on the federal government to take action. To call attention to their plights peaceful rallies have been held in cities like Edmonton, Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver. A grassroot movement called Spousal Sponsorship Advocates is organizing rallies around the country for September 19, 2020. A Facebook group called “Canadian Spousal Sponsorship Applicants Affected by COVID-19” is asking the government to “prioritize” family sponsorship applications. Jenny Kwan, Member of Parliament, said she has heard from people across the country who are experiencing lengthy delays with spousal applications. Ms. Kwan said she wrote a letter to Immigration Minister, Marco Mendicino, outlining her concerns and including examples of delays and the problems they are causing for people. A petition, lead by Ms. Kwan has received several thousand signatures calling for the creation of a Special Temporary Resident Visa to allow spouses and their children to reunite with their Canadian partners. The immigration minister responded to Kwan’s letter and acknowledged that COVID-19 has caused service disruptions within the government, and that they are still operating on reduced capacity. He listed the measures the department has taken to accommodate foreign spouses such as extending deadlines for submitting documents, and giving permanent resident applicants more time to apply to extend their stay in Canada, among others. Sponsors and applicants are assured that no application will be closed or refused due to a lack of documentation or an inability to complete the application process under the normal timelines during these pandemic times. The minister of immigration also mentioned the “dual intent” solution: “an applicant seeking permanent residence does not prevent them from seeking temporary residence.” Meaning that people can be in Canada on a temporary residence permit while waiting on their application for permanent residence to be approved. Similarly Raquel Dancho, Member of Parliament who has just been appointed as the official critic for IRCC in the Conservative party’s shadow cabinet published her first open letter, where she recognizes the importance of family unification and the plights of spouses and families during this pandemic times. A group of women and mothers also sent an open letter to the immigration minister on September 5, 2020: We at AfriCanada Immigration understand and share your pain. The pandemic has resulted in unprecedented challenges for all immigration services in all countries, and we know this has been a difficult time for families and others who are making their way through the immigration system. We can assure you that the government of Canada is doing its best, better than most countries, to resolve this and other immigration problems caused by the coronavirus pandemic. It is important that applicants remain patient and recognize profoundly that it is the pandemic, and not Canada that has stalled what used to be a very decent and fair process. Indeed, international spouses of Canadians are exempt from travel restrictions, but the coronavirus is making it difficult for couples to reunite because for example. crucial service outlets, like biometric centres and visa application centres are closed around the world or operating at reduced capacity making processing times slow.

The post Is Canada spousal sponsorship in crisis due to COVID-19? appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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Like other countries around the world, Canada spousal sponsorship process is under a lot of pressure during these COVID-19 times. The Canadian government is committed, and has always made consistent efforts, to ensure that immigrant families are able to stay together. The standard processing time for most family sponsorship applications has been streamlined to 12 months prior to the coronavirus pandemic.

Canada’s Family Class Sponsorship programs are some of the most generous family reunification programs in the developed world. One of the most widely used Family Class streams is the Canada Spousal Sponsorship stream, which facilitates immigration for spouses and common-law partners of Canadian citizens and permanent residents.

canada spousal sponsorship
Canada Immigration Levels Plan: Family Reunification
201820192020
Spouses, Partners, and Children66,00068,00070,000
Parents and Grandparents20,00020,50021,000
Total Family86,00088,50091,000
Source: IRCC

Unfortunately the coronavirus pandemic has upended Canada Spousal Sponsorship stream processes, processing and support services, just like the pandemic has on other immigration programs including students visa, work permit and visiting visa processes. The pandemic has worsened a situation in which families already feel that Temporary Resident Visas (TRV) to visit spouses and families are often denied because applicants have to demonstrate that they would leave Canada at the end of their authorized stay if their permanent residence application is not finalized.

There are countless post-Covid-19 Canada spousal sponsorship horror stories on social media, including the Facebook account of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) The common thread of each story is how family unit has become disrupted as a result of the spousal sponsorship delays consequent to the coronavirus pandemic. See for example Canadian Spousal Sponsorship Applicants Affected by Covid-19.

Moreover, most express dismay that they had received no update or communication from IRCC on the status of their applications since February 2020.

What is IRCC doing to alleviate spousal sponsorship delays?

This is the utmost question on the minds of couples and families affected by the spousal sponsorship delays. The government’s website candidly states that due to the impacts of the coronavirus it is unable to process applications normally or provide accurate processing times. 

Understandably, Canadians who have been separated from their foreign national loved ones for an extended period of time are mounting pressure on the federal government to take action. To call attention to their plights peaceful rallies have been held in cities like Edmonton, Ottawa, Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver.

canada spousal sponsorship

A grassroot movement called Spousal Sponsorship Advocates is organizing rallies around the country for September 19, 2020. A Facebook group called “Canadian Spousal Sponsorship Applicants Affected by COVID-19” is asking the government to “prioritize” family sponsorship applications.

Jenny Kwan, Member of Parliament, said she has heard from people across the country who are experiencing lengthy delays with spousal applications. Ms. Kwan said she wrote a letter to Immigration Minister, Marco Mendicino, outlining her concerns and including examples of delays and the problems they are causing for people.

A petition, lead by Ms. Kwan has received several thousand signatures calling for the creation of a Special Temporary Resident Visa to allow spouses and their children to reunite with their Canadian partners.

The immigration minister responded to Kwan’s letter and acknowledged that COVID-19 has caused service disruptions within the government, and that they are still operating on reduced capacity. He listed the measures the department has taken to accommodate foreign spouses such as extending deadlines for submitting documents, and giving permanent resident applicants more time to apply to extend their stay in Canada, among others. Sponsors and applicants are assured that no application will be closed or refused due to a lack of documentation or an inability to complete the application process under the normal timelines during these pandemic times.

The minister of immigration also mentioned the “dual intent” solution: “an applicant seeking permanent residence does not prevent them from seeking temporary residence.” Meaning that people can be in Canada on a temporary residence permit while waiting on their application for permanent residence to be approved.

Similarly Raquel Dancho, Member of Parliament who has just been appointed as the official critic for IRCC in the Conservative party’s shadow cabinet published her first open letter, where she recognizes the importance of family unification and the plights of spouses and families during this pandemic times.

canada spousal sponsorship

A group of women and mothers also sent an open letter to the immigration minister on September 5, 2020:

We at AfriCanada Immigration understand and share your pain. The pandemic has resulted in unprecedented challenges for all immigration services in all countries, and we know this has been a difficult time for families and others who are making their way through the immigration system. We can assure you that the government of Canada is doing its best, better than most countries, to resolve this and other immigration problems caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

It is important that applicants remain patient and recognize profoundly that it is the pandemic, and not Canada that has stalled what used to be a very decent and fair process. Indeed, international spouses of Canadians are exempt from travel restrictions, but the coronavirus is making it difficult for couples to reunite because for example. crucial service outlets, like biometric centres and visa application centres are closed around the world or operating at reduced capacity making processing times slow.

The post Is Canada spousal sponsorship in crisis due to COVID-19? appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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Canada updates pre-arrival services to help newcomers settle during COVID-19https://www.africanada.com/canada-updates-pre-arrival-services-to-help-newcomers-settle-during-covid-19/ Thu, 10 Sep 2020 21:45:17 +0000https://www.africanada.com/?p=56645Canadian newcomer service provider organizations are now delivering Canada pre-arrival services and settlement and re-settlement services by phone, email or video to further assist newcomers to the country. Canada pre-arrival service provider organizations (SPOs) are also following local health authority guidance to make plans for safely reopen their offices. Many SPOs are focusing on delivering critical services while offering non-critical services (like remote language training) by telephone, email or online. Canada pre-arrival services can help you to prepare for your move to Canada get your education, work experience and credentials recognized in Canada connect with employers to find a job connect with free services after you arrive in Canada Canada pre-arrival services SPOs help Canadian newcomers to: look for a job get a language assessment register for language classes find a place to live fill out forms and applications sign up your kids for school learn about community services You can use the IRCC’s Canada pre-arrival services search tool Find free newcomer services near you on its website to find Canada pre-arrival services nearest to where you intend to settle or have settled. ISPOs providing Canada pre-arrival services Below are some of the organizations that you can contact to help you with Canada pre-arrival, settlement or re-settlement services. Active Engagement and Integration Project This project offers in-person services in China, and online services globally, such as: general information about living in Canada orientation to education, health care, housing and transportation in Canada needs assessment referrals to community services Languages of service: English, French, Cantonese and Mandarin. Planning for Canada The program offers in-person services in India and the Philippines, as well as online services globally, including: general information about living in Canada orientation to education, health care, housing and transportation in Canada needs assessment referrals to community services Languages of service: English, French and other local languages. Next Stop Canada This organization offers online services globally, including: general information about living in Canada orientation to education, health care, housing and transportation in Canada needs assessment referrals to community services specialized programming for youth between 12 to 19 years old, such as connections to youth mentors Languages of service: English, French, Arabic, Bengali, Cantonese, Farsi, Hindi, Kurdish, Mandarin, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog and Urdu. Services for Francophone communities and French-speaking newcomers Connexions Francophones This program offers in-person services in Morocco and online services globally. If you want to live in a Francophone community in Canada, they can help you with: information and orientation connections with Francophone local organizations needs assessment a personalized settlement plan with other links to in-Canada resources Languages of service: French, English and Arabic. Services for refugees Canadian Orientation Abroad This program offers specialized group orientation in local languages to refugees selected to resettle in Canada. You can access support services on-site such as: child-minding translation interpretation transportation Languages of service: English, French and Arabic. See also Settling in Canada as a newcomer.

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Canadian newcomer service provider organizations are now delivering Canada pre-arrival services and settlement and re-settlement services by phone, email or video to further assist newcomers to the country. Canada pre-arrival service provider organizations (SPOs) are also following local health authority guidance to make plans for safely reopen their offices.

Many SPOs are focusing on delivering critical services while offering non-critical services (like remote language training) by telephone, email or online.

Canada pre-arrival services can help you to

  • prepare for your move to Canada
  • get your education, work experience and credentials recognized in Canada
  • connect with employers to find a job
  • connect with free services after you arrive in Canada

Canada pre-arrival services SPOs help Canadian newcomers to:

  • look for a job
  • get a language assessment
  • register for language classes
  • find a place to live
  • fill out forms and applications
  • sign up your kids for school
  • learn about community services

You can use the IRCC’s Canada pre-arrival services search tool Find free newcomer services near you on its website to find Canada pre-arrival services nearest to where you intend to settle or have settled.

canada pre-arrival services

ISPOs providing Canada pre-arrival services

Below are some of the organizations that you can contact to help you with Canada pre-arrival, settlement or re-settlement services.

Active Engagement and Integration Project

This project offers in-person services in China, and online services globally, such as:

  • general information about living in Canada
  • orientation to education, health care, housing and transportation in Canada
  • needs assessment
  • referrals to community services

Languages of service: English, French, Cantonese and Mandarin.

Planning for Canada

The program offers in-person services in India and the Philippines, as well as online services globally, including:

  • general information about living in Canada
  • orientation to education, health care, housing and transportation in Canada
  • needs assessment
  • referrals to community services

Languages of service: English, French and other local languages.

Next Stop Canada

This organization offers online services globally, including:

  • general information about living in Canada
  • orientation to education, health care, housing and transportation in Canada
  • needs assessment
  • referrals to community services
  • specialized programming for youth between 12 to 19 years old, such as connections to youth mentors

Languages of service: English, French, Arabic, Bengali, Cantonese, Farsi, Hindi, Kurdish, Mandarin, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Tagalog and Urdu.

Services for Francophone communities and French-speaking newcomers

Connexions Francophones

This program offers in-person services in Morocco and online services globally. If you want to live in a Francophone community in Canada, they can help you with:

  • information and orientation
  • connections with Francophone local organizations
  • needs assessment
  • a personalized settlement plan with other links to in-Canada resources

Languages of service: French, English and Arabic.

Services for refugees

Canadian Orientation Abroad

This program offers specialized group orientation in local languages to refugees selected to resettle in Canada.

You can access support services on-site such as:

  • child-minding
  • translation
  • interpretation
  • transportation

Languages of service: English, French and Arabic.

See also Settling in Canada as a newcomer.

The post Canada updates pre-arrival services to help newcomers settle during COVID-19 appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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Ontario to adopt OINP Expression of Interest Systemhttps://www.africanada.com/ontario-to-adopt-oinp-expression-of-interest-system/ Wed, 09 Sep 2020 20:57:45 +0000https://www.africanada.com/?p=56638Ontario’s Ministry of Labour, Training and Skills Development is proposing changes to the OINP application process to introduce an Expression of Interest (EOI) system. The changes will enable OINP to more strategically manage intake, increase the OINP’s labour market responsiveness and better respond to regional labour market needs. The amendments would introduce an Expression of Interest system for the following OINP streams: • Employer Job Offer Category (Foreign Worker; International Student, and In-Demand Skills streams);• Masters Graduate; and• Ph.D. Graduate. Currently, these five OINP streams use a first-come first-served approach for accepting applications. This means that applications are only accepted during designated intake periods. Many of the five OINP streams have been troubled by application intake challenges in the past. For example, both the Masters Graduate and Foreign Worker streams often open for only a matter of minutes before reaching capacity and closing again. This first-come first-served approach has been criticized for unfairly advantaging individuals with better computer and internet connectivity and the ability to monitor the program constantly for future intake rounds.  According to Ontario, an OINP Expression of Interest system would allow Ontario to:• Increase the OINP’s labor market responsiveness and better respond to regional labour market needs;• Strategically manage high demand for the OINP thereby creating more predictability for applicants and employers; and• Manage OINP intake in a way that prioritizes the most suitable applicants. Based on the huge successes of the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) used in the federal Express Entry system, many Canadian provinces have adopted an EOI-based approach to selecting candidates through their Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs). The federal Express Entry pool consists of candidates profiles under the Federal Skilled Worker Class; the Federal Skilled Trades Class; and the Canadian Experience Class. The Canadian federal government and the provincial and territorial governments regularly draws candidates from this pool to issue Invitations to Apply (ITAs) based on particular needs and shortages in the country or provinces. The federal Express Entry system has invited 69,950 immigration candidates to apply for permanent residence in Canada so far this year. Using a points-based EOI selection system enables provinces to prioritize candidates with certain skills  or demographic characteristics that meet regional labour market needs. An EOI system also enables provinces to streamline the selection process. Under OINP Expression of Interest system, individuals would register with the OINP and be placed in a selection pool similar to the federal Express Entry system pool. Individuals would then be required to provide personal information and other labour market and/or human capital information that would form the basis of any Invitation to Apply (ITA). An individual’s EOI would be scored based on the information provided in their EOI. The OINP would review the scoring and issue invitations to apply (ITAs) to selected EOI registrants. Registrants who received an ITA would be eligible to apply for nomination to settle in Ontario as permanent residents under the OINP. Although Ontario is yet to provide details about scoring factors or point totals, it has announced that regulatory changes will be made that enable OINP to:• Conduct either a general draw, or a targeted draw of select EOI registrants;• Score prospective applicants based on information in the EOI;• Determine and publish EOI point allocation to the OINP’s website;• Allocate points to various factors (e.g. level of education, language, etc.)• Issue top scoring potential applicants in each category an ITA. See Proposed OINP Expression of Interest system

The post Ontario to adopt OINP Expression of Interest System appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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Ontario’s Ministry of Labour, Training and Skills Development is proposing changes to the OINP application process to introduce an Expression of Interest (EOI) system. The changes will enable OINP to more strategically manage intake, increase the OINP’s labour market responsiveness and better respond to regional labour market needs.

The amendments would introduce an Expression of Interest system for the following OINP streams:

Employer Job Offer Category (Foreign Worker; International Student, and In-Demand Skills streams);
Masters Graduate; and
Ph.D. Graduate.

Currently, these five OINP streams use a first-come first-served approach for accepting applications. This means that applications are only accepted during designated intake periods. Many of the five OINP streams have been troubled by application intake challenges in the past. For example, both the Masters Graduate and Foreign Worker streams often open for only a matter of minutes before reaching capacity and closing again. This first-come first-served approach has been criticized for unfairly advantaging individuals with better computer and internet connectivity and the ability to monitor the program constantly for future intake rounds. 

According to Ontario, an OINP Expression of Interest system would allow Ontario to:
• Increase the OINP’s labor market responsiveness and better respond to regional labour market needs;
• Strategically manage high demand for the OINP thereby creating more predictability for applicants and employers; and
• Manage OINP intake in a way that prioritizes the most suitable applicants.

Based on the huge successes of the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) used in the federal Express Entry system, many Canadian provinces have adopted an EOI-based approach to selecting candidates through their Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs). The federal Express Entry pool consists of candidates profiles under the Federal Skilled Worker Class; the Federal Skilled Trades Class; and the Canadian Experience Class. The Canadian federal government and the provincial and territorial governments regularly draws candidates from this pool to issue Invitations to Apply (ITAs) based on particular needs and shortages in the country or provinces. The federal Express Entry system has invited 69,950 immigration candidates to apply for permanent residence in Canada so far this year.

Using a points-based EOI selection system enables provinces to prioritize candidates with certain skills  or demographic characteristics that meet regional labour market needs. An EOI system also enables provinces to streamline the selection process.

Under OINP Expression of Interest system, individuals would register with the OINP and be placed in a selection pool similar to the federal Express Entry system pool. Individuals would then be required to provide personal information and other labour market and/or human capital information that would form the basis of any Invitation to Apply (ITA).

An individual’s EOI would be scored based on the information provided in their EOI. The OINP would review the scoring and issue invitations to apply (ITAs) to selected EOI registrants. Registrants who received an ITA would be eligible to apply for nomination to settle in Ontario as permanent residents under the OINP.

Although Ontario is yet to provide details about scoring factors or point totals, it has announced that regulatory changes will be made that enable OINP to:
• Conduct either a general draw, or a targeted draw of select EOI registrants;
• Score prospective applicants based on information in the EOI;
• Determine and publish EOI point allocation to the OINP’s website;
• Allocate points to various factors (e.g. level of education, language, etc.)
• Issue top scoring potential applicants in each category an ITA.

See Proposed OINP Expression of Interest system

The post Ontario to adopt OINP Expression of Interest System appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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Canada vows to prevent migrant worker abuse by employershttps://www.africanada.com/canada-vows-to-prevent-migrant-worker-abuse-by-employers/ Tue, 08 Sep 2020 20:45:07 +0000https://www.africanada.com/?p=56633Canada has announced a new measure to prevent and protect against migrant worker abuse by their employers. Migrant workers in Canada on employer-specific work permits who are experiencing abuse, or who are at risk of abuse, in the context of their employment in Canada may be eligible to receive a temporary open work permit that is exempt from the Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) process, per section 207.1 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR), to work with any other employer. In announcing the migrant worker abuse open work permit measure (Open work permits for vulnerable workers) Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) states the following objectives of the new migrant worker abuse measure: to provide migrant workers who are experiencing abuse, or who are at risk of abuse, with a distinct means to leave their employer This is done by opening the possibility of obtaining a work authorization for other employers. to mitigate the risk of migrant workers in Canada who are leaving their job and working irregularly (that is, without authorization) as a result of abusive situations to facilitate the participation of migrant workers who are experiencing abuse, or who are at risk of abuse, in any relevant inspection of their former employer, recruiter or both to help migrant workers in assisting authorities, if required (noting that this is not required for the issuance of the open work permit), by reducing the perceived risk and fear of work permit revocation and removal from Canada What is migrant worker abuse? IRCC states that any behaviour that scares, controls or isolates you could be abuse. Abuse can be physical, sexual, financial or mental. Examples of abuse that you should report in your application include: physical harm forcing you to work in a way that’s unsafe or puts your health at risk unsafe or unsanitary living conditions in employer-provided housing sexual touching that you did not agree to making unwanted sexual comments to you controlling where you can go stealing from you stopping you from seeing friends or co-workers taking some or all of the money you are paid threats, insults and intimidation forcing you to commit fraud If you’re being abused or at risk of being abused in any of the manners above in relation to your job in Canada, you may be eligible for an open work permit for vulnerable workers. A temporary migrant worker abuse open work permit lets you work for any employer in Canada, except for one that: is listed as ineligible on the list of employers who have failed to comply with the conditions or regularly offers striptease, erotic dance, escort services or erotic massages This work permit helps protect your rights as a worker in Canada by helping you leave an abusive situation to find a new job. However, it’s a temporary solution until you find another employer, and: has an expiry date, and can’t be renewed If you’re approved for this work permit, it should give you enough time to find a new employer and apply for a new work permit. You must apply for another work permit before this temporary migrant worker abuse open work permit expires if you want to stay and work in Canada. Who can apply for migrant worker abuse open work permit? You can apply if you: are inside Canada applications made at a port of entry won’t be accepted have a valid employer-specific work permit this is a work permit that has your employer’s name on it and isn’t expired (or you applied to renew it before it expired) are being abused or at risk of being abused in relation to your job in Canada Fees There are no fees for this work permit. How to apply for migrant worker abuse open work permit? You must apply online. Take the following steps: Step 1: Make sure you have what you need To apply online, you’ll need a scanner or camera to create electronic copies of your documents. Step 2: Read the instruction guide Even if you apply online, you should read the IRCC instruction guide before you complete your application. The guide will explain how to complete each field on the form. Step 3: Support your application with evidence To support your application, include as much evidence as you can with your application. You can upload documents as evidence in the “Client Information” field under “Optional Documents”. There is only one “Client Information” field to upload all of your evidence. You have to combine all your evidence in 1 file and upload it together. Find out how to upload multiple documents into 1 field. One document that you must include as evidence is a letter to describe your situation and the abuse you’re facing or at risk of facing. Other types of evidence could include: a letter, statement or report from an abuse support organization, medical doctor, healthcare professional, etc. a sworn statement, also known as an affidavit, from yourself a copy of an official report you submitted to an enforcement agency, such as a police or Canada Border Services Agency report a copy of an official complaint submitted to a provincial enforcement agency, such as an Employment Standards Branch a victim impact statement email messages photos showing injuries or working conditions witness testimony The above list includes examples of evidence. You may have other types of evidence. Step 4: Create your online account or sign in You need an account to apply online. You can use your account to: submit your application upload documents check your application status Create an account or sign in now Step 5: Get to the application After you sign in to your account, follow these steps to get to the migrant worker abuse open work permit application: Under “Start an application”, choose “Apply to come to Canada” Choose “Visitor visa, study and/or work permit” Answer the questions in the online tool For question 1 “What would you like to do in Canada?“, choose “Work” When asked “What is your current country/territory of residence?”, choose “Canada” When asked “Do you have a written job offer?”, choose “No” When asked “Does this situation apply to you? You have a valid employer-specific work permit and are being abused or there is a risk of being abused in relation to your job in Canada?”, choose “Yes” When you get to the page that says “Your results”, choose “Open work permit for vulnerable workers” When you apply online, you’ll be asked if you’ve given your biometrics for an application in the past. If you’ve given them in the past, choose “Yes”. If you haven’t given them in the past, choose “No”. When asked about the fee, choose the option that says you’re exempt from paying the fee. By choosing this option, you won’t be asked to pay the fee later in the application process. When you’ve answered all the questions, you’ll get your document checklist. It includes the form “Application to Change Conditions, Extend my Stay or Remain in Canada as a Worker (IMM5710)”. This is the work permit form you need to fill out. If you can’t apply online You can submit a paper application in any of these situations: you can’t apply online because of a disability there’s a problem with our online application system Go to the IRCC office closest to you or contact the Client Support Centre for more information on how to apply. After you apply for migrant worker abuse open work permit After IRCC has received your application at the local office, the will contact you within 5 business days to tell you what to do next. IRCC may ask you to do an interview. After you get your migrant worker abuse open work permit, IRCC may contact your employer to perform an inspection. IRCC won’t contact them for any other reason. Inspections IRCC inspects employers to make sure they follow the rules when hiring temporary workers through the International Mobility Program or the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. Inspections are meant to protect temporary workers. If you’re approved for the migrant worker abuse open work permit for vulnerable workers, IRCC may ask you to give information to help them inspect your former employer. You don’t have to give us information. The choice is yours. The inspection can happen at any time after you get your open work permit. Open work permit for your family members Family members who came with you to Canada may also be eligible for the migrant worker abuse open work permit if your application is approved. They must complete their own application but may submit it together with your application. See also Guidance on abuse in the context of COVID-19 Related: Jobs in Canada for Foreigners

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Canada has announced a new measure to prevent and protect against migrant worker abuse by their employers. Migrant workers in Canada on employer-specific work permits who are experiencing abuse, or who are at risk of abuse, in the context of their employment in Canada may be eligible to receive a temporary open work permit that is exempt from the Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) process, per section 207.1 of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (IRPR), to work with any other employer.

In announcing the migrant worker abuse open work permit measure (Open work permits for vulnerable workers) Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) states the following objectives of the new migrant worker abuse measure:

  • to provide migrant workers who are experiencing abuse, or who are at risk of abuse, with a distinct means to leave their employer
    • This is done by opening the possibility of obtaining a work authorization for other employers.
  • to mitigate the risk of migrant workers in Canada who are leaving their job and working irregularly (that is, without authorization) as a result of abusive situations
  • to facilitate the participation of migrant workers who are experiencing abuse, or who are at risk of abuse, in any relevant inspection of their former employer, recruiter or both
  • to help migrant workers in assisting authorities, if required (noting that this is not required for the issuance of the open work permit), by reducing the perceived risk and fear of work permit revocation and removal from Canada

What is migrant worker abuse?

IRCC states that any behaviour that scares, controls or isolates you could be abuse. Abuse can be physical, sexual, financial or mental.

migrant worker abuse

Examples of abuse that you should report in your application include:

  • physical harm
  • forcing you to work in a way that’s unsafe or puts your health at risk
  • unsafe or unsanitary living conditions in employer-provided housing
  • sexual touching that you did not agree to
  • making unwanted sexual comments to you
  • controlling where you can go
  • stealing from you
  • stopping you from seeing friends or co-workers
  • taking some or all of the money you are paid
  • threats, insults and intimidation
  • forcing you to commit fraud

If you’re being abused or at risk of being abused in any of the manners above in relation to your job in Canada, you may be eligible for an open work permit for vulnerable workers.

A temporary migrant worker abuse open work permit lets you work for any employer in Canada, except for one that:

This work permit helps protect your rights as a worker in Canada by helping you leave an abusive situation to find a new job. However, it’s a temporary solution until you find another employer, and:

  • has an expiry date, and
  • can’t be renewed

If you’re approved for this work permit, it should give you enough time to find a new employer and apply for a new work permit. You must apply for another work permit before this temporary migrant worker abuse open work permit expires if you want to stay and work in Canada.

migrant worker abuse

Who can apply for migrant worker abuse open work permit?

You can apply if you:

  • are inside Canada
    • applications made at a port of entry won’t be accepted
  • have a valid employer-specific work permit
    • this is a work permit that has your employer’s name on it and isn’t expired (or you applied to renew it before it expired)
  • are being abused or at risk of being abused in relation to your job in Canada

Fees

There are no fees for this work permit.

How to apply for migrant worker abuse open work permit?

You must apply online. Take the following steps:

Step 1: Make sure you have what you need

To apply online, you’ll need a scanner or camera to create electronic copies of your documents.

Step 2: Read the instruction guide

Even if you apply online, you should read the IRCC instruction guide before you complete your application. The guide will explain how to complete each field on the form.

Step 3: Support your application with evidence

To support your application, include as much evidence as you can with your application. You can upload documents as evidence in the “Client Information” field under “Optional Documents”.

There is only one “Client Information” field to upload all of your evidence. You have to combine all your evidence in 1 file and upload it together. Find out how to upload multiple documents into 1 field.

One document that you must include as evidence is a letter to describe your situation and the abuse you’re facing or at risk of facing.

Other types of evidence could include:

  • a letter, statement or report from an abuse support organization, medical doctor, healthcare professional, etc.
  • a sworn statement, also known as an affidavit, from yourself
  • a copy of an official report you submitted to an enforcement agency, such as a police or Canada Border Services Agency report
  • a copy of an official complaint submitted to a provincial enforcement agency, such as an Employment Standards Branch
  • victim impact statement
  • email messages
  • photos showing injuries or working conditions
  • witness testimony

The above list includes examples of evidence. You may have other types of evidence.

Step 4: Create your online account or sign in

You need an account to apply online. You can use your account to:

  • submit your application
  • upload documents
  • check your application status

Create an account or sign in now

Step 5: Get to the application

After you sign in to your account, follow these steps to get to the migrant worker abuse open work permit application:

  • Under “Start an application”, choose “Apply to come to Canada
  • Choose “Visitor visa, study and/or work permit
  • Answer the questions in the online tool
  • For question 1 “What would you like to do in Canada?“, choose “Work
  • When asked “What is your current country/territory of residence?”, choose “Canada
  • When asked “Do you have a written job offer?”, choose “No
  • When asked “Does this situation apply to you? You have a valid employer-specific work permit and are being abused or there is a risk of being abused in relation to your job in Canada?”, choose “Yes
  • When you get to the page that says “Your results”, choose “Open work permit for vulnerable workers

NOTE: Fingerprints and photo (biometrics)

As of December 3, 2019, most people applying from inside Canada must give their fingerprints and photo (biometrics). However, because you may be in a vulnerable situation, we won’t ask you to give your biometrics when you apply. If an officer determines you need to give your biometrics, they’ll ask you to give them after you apply.

When you apply online, you’ll be asked if you’ve given your biometrics for an application in the past.

  • If you’ve given them in the past, choose “Yes”.
  • If you haven’t given them in the past, choose “No”.
    • When asked about the fee, choose the option that says you’re exempt from paying the fee.
    • By choosing this option, you won’t be asked to pay the fee later in the application process.

When you’ve answered all the questions, you’ll get your document checklist. It includes the form “Application to Change Conditions, Extend my Stay or Remain in Canada as a Worker (IMM5710)”. This is the work permit form you need to fill out.

If you can’t apply online

You can submit a paper application in any of these situations:

  • you can’t apply online because of a disability
  • there’s a problem with our online application system

Go to the IRCC office closest to you or contact the Client Support Centre for more information on how to apply.

After you apply for migrant worker abuse open work permit

After IRCC has received your application at the local office, the will contact you within 5 business days to tell you what to do next.

IRCC may ask you to do an interview.

After you get your migrant worker abuse open work permit, IRCC may contact your employer to perform an inspection. IRCC won’t contact them for any other reason.

Inspections

IRCC inspects employers to make sure they follow the rules when hiring temporary workers through the International Mobility Program or the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. Inspections are meant to protect temporary workers.

If you’re approved for the migrant worker abuse open work permit for vulnerable workers, IRCC may ask you to give information to help them inspect your former employer. You don’t have to give us information. The choice is yours.

The inspection can happen at any time after you get your open work permit.

Open work permit for your family members

Family members who came with you to Canada may also be eligible for the migrant worker abuse open work permit if your application is approved. They must complete their own application but may submit it together with your application.

See also Guidance on abuse in the context of COVID-19

Related: Jobs in Canada for Foreigners

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Success stories: Algerian Canadian child refugee became music superstarhttps://www.africanada.com/success-stories-algerian-canadian-child-refugee-became-music-superstar/ Tue, 08 Sep 2020 00:02:20 +0000https://www.africanada.com/?p=56559Lynda Thalie (born in Oran, Algeria on 25 June 1978) is a musical pioneer, creator and artist without borders. And a Canadian migrant success story. Most recently Lynda Thalie received the prestigious Charles Biddle prize, awarded by the Minister of Immigration, Diversity and Inclusion, for her remarkable contribution to the cultural development of Quebec nationally and internationally Her family immigrated to Canada and resided in Quebec province since 1994.  Lynda Thalie never knew her father close, as he had left the family when she was young never to return again. Thalie first emigrated to the USA with her mother and brother. She recounts the devastating effect of the loss of her father on her and her family. She also recounts in her autobiographical book Survivre aux naufrages her attempt to commit suicide. She said in an interview that the book in its honesty served as a redeeming experience for her. In 2013, Lynda Thalie released her irresistible album Nomadia to an instant success. Nomadia’s first two singles “Dance Your Pain Away La Tête Haute” and “Merci” reigned over the top 10 of Quebec’s Commercial Radio stations and figured in the 2013 hit list of Rhythm FM. Lynda Thalie has shared her musical vision around the world performing hundreds of shows across four continents in halls as mythic as the Olympia in Paris and in events as prestigious as the Olympic Games. She has been nominated for a plethora of prizes and distinctions. Radio-Canada and RDI picked her as one of 4 Algero-Canadian personalities for its documentary series Mon Algérie et la vôtre. Recently, Lynda Thalie was invited to lend her voice to the Cirque du Soleil in Riyadh, becoming the first woman in the history of Saudi Arabia to sing in front of a television audience of 50 million, and more impressively, a mixed audience (non segregated by gender) of 30,000 spectators, in the King Fahd Stadium, in the presence of his majesty Prince Ben Salman. The Princehad personally commissioned this unique performance, symbolizing a new openness of his country towards the world. The symbolic presence of the shared voice of an unveiled female artist was a significant step forward in woman’s rights. See also Success stories: Hon. Minister Ahmed Hussen -Somali muslim migrant who became Canada Immigration Minister See more Canadian migrants success stories.

The post Success stories: Algerian Canadian child refugee became music superstar appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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Lynda Thalie (born in Oran, Algeria on 25 June 1978) is a musical pioneer, creator and artist without borders. And a Canadian migrant success story. Most recently Lynda Thalie received the prestigious Charles Biddle prize, awarded by the Minister of Immigration, Diversity and Inclusion, for her remarkable contribution to the cultural development of Quebec nationally and internationally

Her family immigrated to Canada and resided in Quebec province since 1994.  Lynda Thalie never knew her father close, as he had left the family when she was young never to return again. Thalie first emigrated to the USA with her mother and brother. She recounts the devastating effect of the loss of her father on her and her family. She also recounts in her autobiographical book Survivre aux naufrages her attempt to commit suicide. She said in an interview that the book in its honesty served as a redeeming experience for her.

In 2013, Lynda Thalie released her irresistible album Nomadia to an instant success. Nomadia’s first two singles “Dance Your Pain Away La Tête Haute” and “Merci” reigned over the top 10 of Quebec’s Commercial Radio stations and figured in the 2013 hit list of Rhythm FM.

Lynda Thalie has shared her musical vision around the world performing hundreds of shows across four continents in halls as mythic as the Olympia in Paris and in events as prestigious as the Olympic Games. She has been nominated for a plethora of prizes and distinctions. Radio-Canada and RDI picked her as one of 4 Algero-Canadian personalities for its documentary series Mon Algérie et la vôtre.

Lynda Thalie

Recently, Lynda Thalie was invited to lend her voice to the Cirque du Soleil in Riyadh, becoming the first woman in the history of Saudi Arabia to sing in front of a television audience of 50 million, and more impressively, a mixed audience (non segregated by gender) of 30,000 spectators, in the King Fahd Stadium, in the presence of his majesty Prince Ben Salman. The Prince
had personally commissioned this unique performance, symbolizing a new openness of his country towards the world. The symbolic presence of the shared voice of an unveiled female artist was a significant step forward in woman’s rights.

lynda thalie

See also Success stories: Hon. Minister Ahmed Hussen -Somali muslim migrant who became Canada Immigration Minister

See more Canadian migrants success stories.

The post Success stories: Algerian Canadian child refugee became music superstar appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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New PGWP eligibility rules for international students studying onlinehttps://www.africanada.com/new-pgwp-eligibility-rules-for-international-students-studying-online/ Mon, 07 Sep 2020 21:54:20 +0000https://www.africanada.com/?p=56553Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) announced changes that are being implemented to provide more flexibility on eligibility rules for the Post-Graduation Work Permit Program (PGWP eligibility rules) for students who start their Canadian study program online from abroad. Many prospective international students who would like to study in Canada this fall (2020) are facing uncertainty due to travel restrictions. IRCC recognizes this, and will continue to ensure that Canada’s immigration programs are flexible to respond to these uncertainties with 3 new measures added to PGWP eligibility rules for students beginning programs online. To be eligible for these measures, students must submit a study permit application no later than September 15, 2020 for programs with a fall start date. Three changes to PGWP eligibility rules are being introduced: Students may now study online from abroad until April 30, 2021, with no time deducted from the length of a future post-graduation work permit, provided 50% of their program of study is eventually completed in Canada. Students who have enrolled in a program that is between 8 and 12 months in length, with a start date from May to September 2020, will be able to complete their entire program online from abroad and still be eligible for a post-graduation work permit. Students who have enrolled in a program with a start date from May to September 2020 and study online up to April 30, 2021, and who graduate from more than one eligible program of study, may be able to combine the length of their programs of study when they apply for a post-graduation work permit in the future, as long as 50% of their total studies are completed in Canada. To be eligible for these measures, students must have submitted a study permit application before starting a program of study in the fall 2020 semester, or the January 2021 semester. All students must eventually be approved for a study permit. The PGWP enables international students to gain Canadian work experience which is a crucial factor when they later apply for Canada permanent residence. After a student completes an eligible program at a Canadian university or college they can obtain PGWP to work for any Canadian employer, for a maximum duration of three years. The work experience significantly improves their Canadian PR chances. How your PGWP eligibility is affected If you graduated or will graduate from a DLI that offers PGWPP-eligible programs, you’re still eligible for a post-graduation work permit if your in-class courses in Canada are moved to an online-only format because of COVID-19, or you had to put your studies on hold or study part-time because of COVID-19 during the winter, spring or summer 2020 semesters If you’re outside of Canada You’re still eligible for a post-graduation work permit if you can’t travel to Canada at this time due to travel restrictions and you have a study permit you’ve been approved for a study permit you applied for a study permit before starting your study program in the spring, summer or fall 2020 semesters, or you will apply for a study permit before starting your study program in the January 2021 semester If you’re in this situation, you can begin your classes while outside Canada and complete 100% of your program online if your program is between 8 and 12 months in length, and you started your studies between May and September 2020 complete up to 50% of your program online (until April 30, 2021) if you complete the other 50% of your program in Canada complete up to 50% of your studies online (until April 30, 2021) if you’ll graduate from 2 different eligible study programs within 2 years of each other 1 of the programs started between May and September 2020 each program is at least 8 months long, and you complete at least 50% of the combined length of the programs in Canada If you apply for your study permit before starting your program, any time spent studying online from outside Canada since spring 2020 now counts toward the length of a post graduation work permit. (Before, only the time spent studying online after you were approved for a study permit counted.) You won’t have time deducted from the length of your post-graduation work permit for studies you complete outside Canada until April 30, 2021. See IRCC Announcement: How your PGWPP eligibility is affected. See also IRCC makes temporary policy changes to support international students affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) announced changes that are being implemented to provide more flexibility on eligibility rules for the Post-Graduation Work Permit Program (PGWP eligibility rules) for students who start their Canadian study program online from abroad. Many prospective international students who would like to study in Canada this fall (2020) are facing uncertainty due to travel restrictions. IRCC recognizes this, and will continue to ensure that Canada’s immigration programs are flexible to respond to these uncertainties with 3 new measures added to PGWP eligibility rules for students beginning programs online.

To be eligible for these measures, students must submit a study permit application no later than September 15, 2020 for programs with a fall start date.

pgwp eligibility

Three changes to PGWP eligibility rules are being introduced:

  • Students may now study online from abroad until April 30, 2021, with no time deducted from the length of a future post-graduation work permit, provided 50% of their program of study is eventually completed in Canada.
  • Students who have enrolled in a program that is between 8 and 12 months in length, with a start date from May to September 2020, will be able to complete their entire program online from abroad and still be eligible for a post-graduation work permit.
  • Students who have enrolled in a program with a start date from May to September 2020 and study online up to April 30, 2021, and who graduate from more than one eligible program of study, may be able to combine the length of their programs of study when they apply for a post-graduation work permit in the future, as long as 50% of their total studies are completed in Canada.
pgwp eligibility

To be eligible for these measures, students must have submitted a study permit application before starting a program of study in the fall 2020 semester, or the January 2021 semester. All students must eventually be approved for a study permit.

The PGWP enables international students to gain Canadian work experience which is a crucial factor when they later apply for Canada permanent residence. After a student completes an eligible program at a Canadian university or college they can obtain PGWP to work for any Canadian employer, for a maximum duration of three years. The work experience significantly improves their Canadian PR chances.

How your PGWP eligibility is affected

If you graduated or will graduate from a DLI that offers PGWPP-eligible programs, you’re still eligible for a post-graduation work permit if

  • your in-class courses in Canada are moved to an online-only format because of COVID-19, or
  • you had to put your studies on hold or study part-time because of COVID-19 during the winter, spring or summer 2020 semesters

If you’re outside of Canada

You’re still eligible for a post-graduation work permit if you can’t travel to Canada at this time due to travel restrictions and

  • you have a study permit
  • you’ve been approved for a study permit
  • you applied for a study permit before starting your study program in the spring, summer or fall 2020 semesters, or
  • you will apply for a study permit before starting your study program in the January 2021 semester
pgwp eligibility

If you’re in this situation, you can begin your classes while outside Canada and

  • complete 100% of your program online if
    • your program is between 8 and 12 months in length, and
    • you started your studies between May and September 2020
  • complete up to 50% of your program online (until April 30, 2021) if you complete the other 50% of your program in Canada
  • complete up to 50% of your studies online (until April 30, 2021) if
    • you’ll graduate from 2 different eligible study programs within 2 years of each other
    • 1 of the programs started between May and September 2020
    • each program is at least 8 months long, and
    • you complete at least 50% of the combined length of the programs in Canada

If you apply for your study permit before starting your program, any time spent studying online from outside Canada since spring 2020 now counts toward the length of a post graduation work permit. (Before, only the time spent studying online after you were approved for a study permit counted.)

You won’t have time deducted from the length of your post-graduation work permit for studies you complete outside Canada until April 30, 2021.

See IRCC Announcement: How your PGWPP eligibility is affected.

See also IRCC makes temporary policy changes to support international students affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Canada’s CMHA-YRSS launches Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being Service.https://www.africanada.com/canadas-cmha-yrss-launches-newcomers-health-and-well-being-service/ Mon, 07 Sep 2020 09:16:02 +0000https://www.africanada.com/?p=56542The Canadian Mental Health Association, York and South Simcoe (CMHA-YRSS) has launched an innovative program, Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being, to meet the unique mental health and primary care needs of immigrants and refugees in the area. The Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being program is funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) to the tune of $2.2 million and it’s designed to meet the needs of each newcomer in a personalized and comprehensive manner. CMHA-YRSS says that its Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being will reduce reliance on Canada’s emergency departments. According to CMHA-YRSS, the 2016 Census Release Report revealed that 47% of the population of York Region was born outside of Canada. York Region had the third highest proportion of immigrants in the GTA, with 51,410 recent immigrants settling there between 2011 and 2016. “Research has shown that incidents of mental distress, depression, anxiety, and impact of trauma are significantly higher for immigrants and refugees, but settlement agencies and other providers report a lack of access to culturally appropriate, trauma-informed care”. Funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and in partnership with Cedar Centre, settlement agencies and community care providers, the CMHA-YRSS program will seek to address this gap and improve mental health and well-being outcomes for immigrants and refugees aged 12 years and older. The Honourable Marco Mendicino, Canada’s federal Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, said: “Taking care of our mental health is extremely important for all Canadians, including newcomers and refugees. Many refugees have been through unimaginable trauma.  By providing settlement workers with mental health training, outreach and education, CMHA is ensuring that newcomers or refugees who may be suffering from depression, mental distress or trauma can feel safe and secure in knowing that mental health services are available to them as they begin their new life in Canada. On behalf of IRCC, I congratulate CMHA today for the launch of their innovative new program, Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being.” Likewise CMHA-YRSS CEO Rebecca Shields said: “I’m thrilled that support from IRCC is enabling us to launch this innovative and much-needed program. We know that migration and settlement can be a stressful and sometimes traumatic life event that comes with unique mental health impacts. We are always looking to identify the mental healthcare needs of our community and being able to increase culturally appropriate access to care means better health and social outcomes for individuals, their families and our community.” Settlement agencies and community care providers will refer individuals in need of care to CMHA, with services to be provided at CMHA sites, local Welcome Centres, and other community locations convenient to the newcomer. Services will include a comprehensive mental and physical health assessment, counselling/psychotherapy, psychoeducation, health promotion, training/education, consultation, and coordinated care, provided by a nurse practitioner, clinical therapists, and program coordinator. Those in need of trauma-specific services will be referred to Cedar Centre. The Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being program is expected to reduce reliance on emergency departments, police, and other crisis services through system capacity building and education provided to those who work directly with newcomers, early identification and intervention and improved access to care. Critically, the Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being program will improve health outcomes and the social inclusion of immigrants and refugees in the community, by providing culturally appropriate mental health awareness and education and supporting clients to navigate the healthcare system and receive ongoing support. Brenton Diaz, Clinical Coordinator and Therapist at the Cedar Centre said: “The Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being Program fills an important gap in York Region by offering holistic services to promote health in culturally-appropriate ways, honouring the strengths of our Newcomer/Refugee communities. This unique Program provides vital support to our Newcomer/Refugee communities to help better their lives through an unprecedented and unified partnership of agencies and sectors.” Patricia Cousins, CEO for Social Enterprise for Canada and a Lead Partner for Welcome Centre Immigrant Services in York Region said: “CMHA is a strong new partner within the Welcome Centre system. The five principal partners are excited to bring this agency’s expertise and support to newcomers in York and Simcoe Regions.” According to information on NewMarketToday.ca, the immigrant population in northern York Region, South Simcoe and the surrounding area has been steadily increasing for several years, creating a larger need for cultural supports.  The following information is directly from NewMarketToday.ca. To address that growing demand, the Newcomers Health and Well-being program was created by the Canadian Mental Health Association York Region and South Simcoe (CMHA-YRSS) to meet the unique mental health and primary care needs of immigrants and refugees in the area.  Through the program, CMHA-YRSS will work with the settlement sector to provide culturally appropriate training, with the goal of reducing reliance on emergency departments, crisis services, and police.   “The big piece here that we want to stress is the program offers supports in a culturally appropriate manner, so I think helping other professionals out there understand and learn about the different ways mental health can manifest across cultures is key,” said Kylee Goldman, CMHA-YRSS Newcomers Wellbeing program manager.   “Across individuals, mental health looks very different and also across cultures, people express stress, anxiety and sadness in different ways.”   The program helps educate the people who facilitate settlement services about what mental health issues might look like amongst newcomers.  Its goal is to move support services away from being reactive towards something that’s more proactive – aimed at early intervention instead of relying on emergency services when a person reaches their breaking point. The Newcomers Health and Wellbeing program is offered throughout South Simcoe and in York Region, where 47 per cent of the population was born outside of Canada.  Incidents of mental distress, depression and anxiety are significantly higher for immigrants and particularly refugees who are often fleeing from conflict.   However, much of the time, those newcomers aren’t getting the care they need. Settlement agencies and other service providers generally lack culturally appropriate or trauma-informed care, but work to change that is now underway.   “People who pick up their lives from one country and move here to start a new life for themself, there’s a lot of loss,” Goldman noted.   “The family would have been their main source of emotional support, so to not have them around can be really difficult to navigate the cultural differences and potential language barriers, as they try to meet new people and find out where they can fit into the community,” she continued.   “There’s a loss of culture and loss of language and communication, so I think that that is one of the main things I do see.”  Individuals who are migrating to Canada often have a lot in common and somewhat of a shared experience.   “A lot of people coming to a new place, everything in society is so very different, the way that people grocery shop, the types of food that people can buy.”  “They can’t find the items they normally cook with to nourish themselves, so, in so many aspects of people’s lives… they experience the stress of being a newcomer in a place that is so different from their own home.”  An important part of becoming more proactive with refugee and immigrant supports is making sure they are aware of the services available to them, Goldman explained.   “We want them to know where they can get support and be well, that there’s options available right now, so that if and when, later on they do decide they’re not doing well and need the support, they know where to go to access those supports,” she said.   The program is designed to give immigrants the tools they need when feeling overwhelmed, at a loss or alone, while building connections.   “Really, the idea of the program is to promote a sense of community and belonging for each and every person and to validate the experiences they are having,” Goldman explained.   “Hopefully we can give them a sense of hope, that they can create the life they are hoping for here, that things will feel more comfortable with time.”  Going forward, Goldman said the CMHA-YRSS anticipates government funding for the program over the next five years and hopes to see it grow from here.   “We are working as an organization to, as much as possible, establish a very well-rounded program and look at ways for future sustainability, so that the program can be maintained and can continue to evolve,” she noted.   “Looking at part of that can lead to expanse, partnerships, and relationships with other community organizations.”   “We’re also looking at outreach to faith-based communities to community centres, so looking at broadening our partnerships with other community agencies to build the program and make sure that bridges are there to keep it going.”  See also Healthcare for newcomers to Canada.

The post Canada’s CMHA-YRSS launches Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being Service. appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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The Canadian Mental Health Association, York and South Simcoe (CMHA-YRSS) has launched an innovative program, Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being, to meet the unique mental health and primary care needs of immigrants and refugees in the area. The Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being program is funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) to the tune of $2.2 million and it’s designed to meet the needs of each newcomer in a personalized and comprehensive manner.

CMHA-YRSS says that its Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being will reduce reliance on Canada’s emergency departments.

Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being

According to CMHA-YRSS, the 2016 Census Release Report revealed that 47% of the population of York Region was born outside of Canada. York Region had the third highest proportion of immigrants in the GTA, with 51,410 recent immigrants settling there between 2011 and 2016.

“Research has shown that incidents of mental distress, depression, anxiety, and impact of trauma are significantly higher for immigrants and refugees, but settlement agencies and other providers report a lack of access to culturally appropriate, trauma-informed care”.

Funded by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) and in partnership with Cedar Centre, settlement agencies and community care providers, the CMHA-YRSS program will seek to address this gap and improve mental health and well-being outcomes for immigrants and refugees aged 12 years and older.

The Honourable Marco Mendicino, Canada’s federal Minister of Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, said:

“Taking care of our mental health is extremely important for all Canadians, including newcomers and refugees. Many refugees have been through unimaginable trauma.  By providing settlement workers with mental health training, outreach and education, CMHA is ensuring that newcomers or refugees who may be suffering from depression, mental distress or trauma can feel safe and secure in knowing that mental health services are available to them as they begin their new life in Canada. On behalf of IRCC, I congratulate CMHA today for the launch of their innovative new program, Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being.”

Likewise CMHA-YRSS CEO Rebecca Shields said:

“I’m thrilled that support from IRCC is enabling us to launch this innovative and much-needed program. We know that migration and settlement can be a stressful and sometimes traumatic life event that comes with unique mental health impacts. We are always looking to identify the mental healthcare needs of our community and being able to increase culturally appropriate access to care means better health and social outcomes for individuals, their families and our community.”

Settlement agencies and community care providers will refer individuals in need of care to CMHA, with services to be provided at CMHA sites, local Welcome Centres, and other community locations convenient to the newcomer. Services will include a comprehensive mental and physical health assessment, counselling/psychotherapy, psychoeducation, health promotion, training/education, consultation, and coordinated care, provided by a nurse practitioner, clinical therapists, and program coordinator. Those in need of trauma-specific services will be referred to Cedar Centre.

Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being

The Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being program is expected to reduce reliance on emergency departments, police, and other crisis services through system capacity building and education provided to those who work directly with newcomers, early identification and intervention and improved access to care.

Critically, the Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being program will improve health outcomes and the social inclusion of immigrants and refugees in the community, by providing culturally appropriate mental health awareness and education and supporting clients to navigate the healthcare system and receive ongoing support.

Brenton Diaz, Clinical Coordinator and Therapist at the Cedar Centre said:

“The Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being Program fills an important gap in York Region by offering holistic services to promote health in culturally-appropriate ways, honouring the strengths of our Newcomer/Refugee communities. This unique Program provides vital support to our Newcomer/Refugee communities to help better their lives through an unprecedented and unified partnership of agencies and sectors.”

Patricia Cousins, CEO for Social Enterprise for Canada and a Lead Partner for Welcome Centre Immigrant Services in York Region said:

“CMHA is a strong new partner within the Welcome Centre system. The five principal partners are excited to bring this agency’s expertise and support to newcomers in York and Simcoe Regions.”

According to information on NewMarketToday.ca, the immigrant population in northern York Region, South Simcoe and the surrounding area has been steadily increasing for several years, creating a larger need for cultural supports.  The following information is directly from NewMarketToday.ca.

To address that growing demand, the Newcomers Health and Well-being program was created by the Canadian Mental Health Association York Region and South Simcoe (CMHA-YRSS) to meet the unique mental health and primary care needs of immigrants and refugees in the area. 

Through the program, CMHA-YRSS will work with the settlement sector to provide culturally appropriate training, with the goal of reducing reliance on emergency departments, crisis services, and police.  

“The big piece here that we want to stress is the program offers supports in a culturally appropriate manner, so I think helping other professionals out there understand and learn about the different ways mental health can manifest across cultures is key,” said Kylee Goldman, CMHA-YRSS Newcomers Wellbeing program manager.  

“Across individuals, mental health looks very different and also across cultures, people express stress, anxiety and sadness in different ways.”  

The program helps educate the people who facilitate settlement services about what mental health issues might look like amongst newcomers. 

Its goal is to move support services away from being reactive towards something that’s more proactive – aimed at early intervention instead of relying on emergency services when a person reaches their breaking point.

The Newcomers Health and Wellbeing program is offered throughout South Simcoe and in York Region, where 47 per cent of the population was born outside of Canada. 

Incidents of mental distress, depression and anxiety are significantly higher for immigrants and particularly refugees who are often fleeing from conflict.  

However, much of the time, those newcomers aren’t getting the care they need. Settlement agencies and other service providers generally lack culturally appropriate or trauma-informed care, but work to change that is now underway.  

“People who pick up their lives from one country and move here to start a new life for themself, there’s a lot of loss,” Goldman noted.  

“The family would have been their main source of emotional support, so to not have them around can be really difficult to navigate the cultural differences and potential language barriers, as they try to meet new people and find out where they can fit into the community,” she continued.  

“There’s a loss of culture and loss of language and communication, so I think that that is one of the main things I do see.” 

Individuals who are migrating to Canada often have a lot in common and somewhat of a shared experience.  

“A lot of people coming to a new place, everything in society is so very different, the way that people grocery shop, the types of food that people can buy.” 

“They can’t find the items they normally cook with to nourish themselves, so, in so many aspects of people’s lives… they experience the stress of being a newcomer in a place that is so different from their own home.” 

An important part of becoming more proactive with refugee and immigrant supports is making sure they are aware of the services available to them, Goldman explained.  

“We want them to know where they can get support and be well, that there’s options available right now, so that if and when, later on they do decide they’re not doing well and need the support, they know where to go to access those supports,” she said.  

The program is designed to give immigrants the tools they need when feeling overwhelmed, at a loss or alone, while building connections.  

“Really, the idea of the program is to promote a sense of community and belonging for each and every person and to validate the experiences they are having,” Goldman explained.  

“Hopefully we can give them a sense of hope, that they can create the life they are hoping for here, that things will feel more comfortable with time.” 

Going forward, Goldman said the CMHA-YRSS anticipates government funding for the program over the next five years and hopes to see it grow from here.  

“We are working as an organization to, as much as possible, establish a very well-rounded program and look at ways for future sustainability, so that the program can be maintained and can continue to evolve,” she noted.  

“Looking at part of that can lead to expanse, partnerships, and relationships with other community organizations.”  

“We’re also looking at outreach to faith-based communities to community centres, so looking at broadening our partnerships with other community agencies to build the program and make sure that bridges are there to keep it going.” 

See also Healthcare for newcomers to Canada.

The post Canada’s CMHA-YRSS launches Newcomers’ Health and Well-Being Service. appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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Success stories – Nigerian migrant is a top Canada immigration lawyer & poethttps://www.africanada.com/success-stories-nigerian-migrant-is-top-canada-immigration-lawyer-poet/ Mon, 07 Sep 2020 00:31:47 +0000https://www.africanada.com/?p=56533Kingsley Jesuorobo is a lawyer by day, a writer by night and many other things in between. Kingsley was born in Nigeria where he was trained as a lawyer and briefly practiced law before resettling in Canada where he returned to law school and continues to practice law. He has won numerous awards for professional excellence in the legal field. Kingsley Jesuorobo holds several leadership positions in legal associations of his peers. He has also led several other organizations, including those promoting human rights and commerce. According to information on his poetry website, Kingsley Jesuorobo grew up in a “nuclear” (to use his expression) family unit comprising of a father, a mother–who passed on early, three step-mothers and 24 siblings. It was extra-ordinarily eye-opening for him. He says that uprooting himself from his upbringing and relocating to and resettling in a new and different Canadian environment and successfully running his law firm were challenging and overwhelming, but it is raising his autistic son that has been the most profoundly life-altering event for him. In between his family, professional and social life, Kingsley converts his love for letters and logic into tools to construct poetic narratives that encompass and dissect sundry subjects: his personal life, autism, governance, politics, religion, philosophy, nature, romance and more. Information from Kingsley Jesuorobo & Associates on their law firm’s website shows that Mr. Kingsley Jesuorobo is a proud recipient of many awards honouring his extraordinary professionalism and accomplishments in legal practice. Mr. Jesuorobo’s record includes the following:  In March 2017, he was elected as President of the Canadian Association of Nigerian Lawyers (CANL) In October 2016, he was appointed as Vice President (North America) of the African Bar Association (AFBA). In September 2010, he was invited to guest-lecture on refugee protection and human rights law at Kellogg College, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, under the sponsorship of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the Fahamu Refugee Program. In March 2017, he was consulted by Center for Applied Legal Studies (CALS), an immigration clinic at the Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, DC, in relation to an asylum case in the USA. In June 2018, he was awarded Excellent Professional Achievement Award by Ondo Foundations Canada In April 2017, he was featured as Thisday (Nigerian Newspaper) Legal Personality. In 2017, he was given an Award of Excellence by Nigerian Bar Association (Benin Branch) In 2017, he was invited to present a paper on human rights law at the African Bar Association Conference in Port-Harcourt, Nigeria. He co-founded Canada’s first 24-hour black television network, First Entertainment Voice of Africa Television (FEVA TV) and acted as the Chief Legal Counsel at FEVA TV (2013 – 2016) In September 2010, he was invited to guest-lecture on refugee protection and human rights law at Kellogg College, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, under the sponsorship of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the Fahamu Refugee Program. In 2011, he was chosen to organize a training program in Toronto for over a dozen judges of Federal High Court of Nigeria. In 2010, he was featured as one of the ten most influential Nigerians in Canada by the Planet Africa Magazine. In 2005, he was invited to guest-lecture on Canadian Immigration and Refugee Law at York University, Canada in 2005. In 2004, he received the Planet Africa Television Award For Professional Excellence. In 2004, he received an Award of Recognition from the Nigerian Canadian Association for his outstanding contribution to the community. From 1996 till date, has has won many victories for clients at Canada’s Federal Court.. In April 1994, he won the case for his first refugee client in Canada while he was still a law student at the University of Toronto. In 1996, he won his first jury trial (Insurance Litigation) case in Canada and successfully argued for the court to award solicitor and client’s costs in favour of his client.. In 2002, he won 154 out of 185 asylum cases argued before the Canadian Immigration and Refugee Board. He was featured in the news for mounting ground-breaking successful challenges at Canada’s Federal Court in a cases of mass deportation of immigrants on short notice in 2003 and 2004. He has been profiled and featured in numerous media outlets such as Planet Africa Television, Eagles World, The Afri-Canadian Journal, African Community Profile Magazine, Nigerian Canadian News, Thisday. Many of his cases have been reported by Canada Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Television, Toronto Star, National Post, Metro, Ottawa Citizen, Halifax Daily News, etc. His legal exploits on behalf of immigrants in Canada prompted a local Toronto newspaper, The Nigerian Monitor, to christen him “Senior Advocate of the Masses” (SAM). He has trained over three dozen lawyers and paralegals. He is a founding, principal and managing partner at JED Solicitors, an international law firm which operates from Canada and Nigeria. See also Success stories: Hon. Minister Ahmed Hussen -Somali muslim migrant who became Canada Immigration Minister See more Canadian migrants success stories.

The post Success stories – Nigerian migrant is a top Canada immigration lawyer & poet appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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Kingsley Jesuorobo is a lawyer by day, a writer by night and many other things in between. Kingsley was born in Nigeria where he was trained as a lawyer and briefly practiced law before resettling in Canada where he returned to law school and continues to practice law. He has won numerous awards for professional excellence in the legal field.

Kingsley Jesuorobo holds several leadership positions in legal associations of his peers. He has also led several other organizations, including those promoting human rights and commerce.

kingsley jesuorobo

According to information on his poetry website, Kingsley Jesuorobo grew up in a “nuclear” (to use his expression) family unit comprising of a father, a mother–who passed on early, three step-mothers and 24 siblings. It was extra-ordinarily eye-opening for him. He says that uprooting himself from his upbringing and relocating to and resettling in a new and different Canadian environment and successfully running his law firm were challenging and overwhelming, but it is raising his autistic son that has been the most profoundly life-altering event for him.

In between his family, professional and social life, Kingsley converts his love for letters and logic into tools to construct poetic narratives that encompass and dissect sundry subjects: his personal life, autism, governance, politics, religion, philosophy, nature, romance and more.

kingsley jesuorobo

Information from Kingsley Jesuorobo & Associates on their law firm’s website shows that Mr. Kingsley Jesuorobo is a proud recipient of many awards honouring his extraordinary professionalism and accomplishments in legal practice. Mr. Jesuorobo’s record includes the following:

  •  In March 2017, he was elected as President of the Canadian Association of Nigerian Lawyers (CANL)
  • In October 2016, he was appointed as Vice President (North America) of the African Bar Association (AFBA).
  • In September 2010, he was invited to guest-lecture on refugee protection and human rights law at Kellogg College, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, under the sponsorship of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the Fahamu Refugee Program.
  • In March 2017, he was consulted by Center for Applied Legal Studies (CALS), an immigration clinic at the Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, DC, in relation to an asylum case in the USA.
  • In June 2018, he was awarded Excellent Professional Achievement Award by Ondo Foundations Canada
  • In April 2017, he was featured as Thisday (Nigerian Newspaper) Legal Personality.
  • In 2017, he was given an Award of Excellence by Nigerian Bar Association (Benin Branch)
  • In 2017, he was invited to present a paper on human rights law at the African Bar Association Conference in Port-Harcourt, Nigeria.
  • He co-founded Canada’s first 24-hour black television network, First Entertainment Voice of Africa Television (FEVA TV) and acted as the Chief Legal Counsel at FEVA TV (2013 – 2016)
  • In September 2010, he was invited to guest-lecture on refugee protection and human rights law at Kellogg College, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, under the sponsorship of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the Fahamu Refugee Program.
  • In 2011, he was chosen to organize a training program in Toronto for over a dozen judges of Federal High Court of Nigeria.
  • In 2010, he was featured as one of the ten most influential Nigerians in Canada by the Planet Africa Magazine.
  • In 2005, he was invited to guest-lecture on Canadian Immigration and Refugee Law at York University, Canada in 2005.
  • In 2004, he received the Planet Africa Television Award For Professional Excellence.
  • In 2004, he received an Award of Recognition from the Nigerian Canadian Association for his outstanding contribution to the community.
  • From 1996 till date, has has won many victories for clients at Canada’s Federal Court..
  • In April 1994, he won the case for his first refugee client in Canada while he was still a law student at the University of Toronto.
  • In 1996, he won his first jury trial (Insurance Litigation) case in Canada and successfully argued for the court to award solicitor and client’s costs in favour of his client..
  • In 2002, he won 154 out of 185 asylum cases argued before the Canadian Immigration and Refugee Board.
  • He was featured in the news for mounting ground-breaking successful challenges at Canada’s Federal Court in a cases of mass deportation of immigrants on short notice in 2003 and 2004.
  • He has been profiled and featured in numerous media outlets such as Planet Africa Television, Eagles World, The Afri-Canadian Journal, African Community Profile Magazine, Nigerian Canadian News, Thisday. Many of his cases have been reported by Canada Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Television, Toronto Star, National Post, Metro, Ottawa Citizen, Halifax Daily News, etc.
  • His legal exploits on behalf of immigrants in Canada prompted a local Toronto newspaper, The Nigerian Monitor, to christen him “Senior Advocate of the Masses” (SAM).
  • He has trained over three dozen lawyers and paralegals.
  • He is a founding, principal and managing partner at JED Solicitors, an international law firm which operates from Canada and Nigeria.
kingsley jesuorobo

See also Success stories: Hon. Minister Ahmed Hussen -Somali muslim migrant who became Canada Immigration Minister

See more Canadian migrants success stories.

The post Success stories – Nigerian migrant is a top Canada immigration lawyer & poet appeared first on Canada Visa & Immigration.

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