Canada Foreign Skilled Worker Immigration Program - AfriCanada Immigration Inc.
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Canada Foreign Skilled Worker Immigration Program

Canada Skilled Worker Program

One of the main goals of Canada skilled worker program is to motivate foreign skilled workers and professionals who will contribute to Canada’s growing economy.  Skilled workers and professionals are greatly needed in Canada.


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canada foreign skilled worker program

Federal Skilled Worker applications are assessed based on an applicant’s ability to become economically established upon immigration to Canada. Successful applicants of the Canada Skilled Worker Immigration programs will receive a Canadian Immigration (permanent resident) Visa, allowing the applicant to immigrate to Canada with his or her family.

As a skilled worker or professional, you have several options to consider. For example, you may be eligible to apply under Canada’s Federal Skilled Worker Class or, if your intended destination is in Quebec, the Quebec Skilled Worker Program may be the pathway for you and your family, if applicable. Moreover, if you know in which province or territory you plan to reside, you may be able to submit an application through one of the Provincial Nominee Programs.

As of January 1, 2015, Federal Skilled Worker applications are being processed through the Express Entry System Selection System. Express Entry is a selection system for Canadian immigration, designed to select skilled workers for immigration to Canada.  CLICK & READExpress Entry is a completely electronic process involving the federal government, provincial governments, and Canadian employers. Candidates eligible under the Federal Skilled Worker Class must first make an expression of interest in immigrating to Canada by creating an online Express Entry profile.

express entry

Below, you will find the links to those programs for you to explore.


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Federal Skilled Worker Canada (FSWC)

Quebec Skilled Worker

Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs)

Six selection factors – Federal Skilled Worker Program (Express Entry)

IRCC (or “we” for the remainder of this page) uses selection factor points to help assess your eligibility for the Federal Skilled Worker Program.

IRCC will assess your selection factors and assign an overall score out of 100.


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If you score 67 points or higher, you may qualify for the Federal Skilled Worker Program.

If you meet the other requirements too, you can submit a profile to the Express Entry pool. Once you’re in the Express Entry pool, we use a different system to rank your profile.

If you score lower than 67 points, you won’t qualify for the program. You may be able to get a higher score by doing things like:

  • improving your language skills
  • completing another degree, diploma, or certificate
  • receiving an offer of arranged employment in Canada

Language skills (maximum 28 points)

It’s very important to be able to communicate in 1 or both of Canada’s official languages. Knowing English, French or both helps you in the Canadian job market.

You can get up to 28 points for your language skills in English and French. We’ll give you points based on your ability to:

  • write
  • read
  • listen
  • speak

Language testing

You must take an approved language test to prove your language levels.


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To measure your English or French levels, we use:

You must get a minimum level of CLB 7 or NCLC 7 for 1 official language in all 4 language areas. To get points for the second official language, you must meet the minimum level of CLB 5 or NCLC 5 in all 4 language areas.

Once you take the language test, you can use it to see exactly how many points we’ll give you for the language selection factor.

Find out more about language testing and how to get tested.

Calculate your language points

First official language (maximum 24 points)

Check the table below and add the points that match your skill level:

Points
First official language Speaking Listening Reading Writing
CLB level 9 or higher 6 6 6 6
CLB level 8 5 5 5 5
CLB level 7 4 4 4 4
Below CLB level 7 Not eligible to apply Not eligible to apply Not eligible to apply Not eligible to apply

Second official language (maximum 4 points)

You can get 4 points only if you have a score of at least CLB 5 in each of the 4 language abilities.

Second official language Points
At least CLB 5 in all of the 4 abilities 4
CLB 4 or less in any of the 4 abilities 0

Education (maximum 25 points)

If you went to school in Canada, you must have a certificate, diploma or degree from a Canadian:

  • secondary (high school) or
  • post-secondary school

If you have foreign education, you must have:

  • an Educational Credential Assessment report from an approved agency showing that your foreign education is equal to a completed certificate, diploma or degree from a Canadian:
    • secondary (high school) or
    • post-secondary school

You must include your Canadian credential or your foreign credential and Educational Credential Assessment report when you apply.

Work experience (maximum 15 points)

You can get points for the number of years you’ve spent doing full-time paid work (at least 30 hours per week, or an equal amount of part-time [15 hours per week for 24 months]) at skill type 0, or skill levels A or B of the 2016 National Occupational Classification.

To get selection factor points, your work experience will count if it was:

  • in Canada or abroad
  • while you were studying
  • while being self-employed

Finding your National Occupational Classification (NOC)

The NOC is a list of all the occupations in the Canadian labour market and is used to classify jobs in the Canadian economy. It describes duties, skills, talents and work settings for different jobs.

You will need to identify the “NOC code” for each job that you want to include in your Express Entry profileFind your NOC to find the information that best matches each of your past jobs.

You’ll need this information again, so make sure to save it.

If the description and list of main duties match what you did at your job(s), you can count this experience for points.

Use this chart to find the number of points based on your number of years of experience.

Experience Maximum 15 points
1 year 9
2-3 years 11
4-5 years 13
6 or more years 15

Age (maximum 12 points)

You’ll get points based on your age on the day we get your application.

Age Points
Under 18 0
18-35 12
36 11
37 10
38 9
39 8
40 7
41 6
42 5
43 4
44 3
45 2
46 1
47 and older 0

Arranged employment in Canada (maximum 10 points)

You can get points if you have a job offer of at least 1 year from a Canadian employer. You must get the job offer before you apply to come to Canada as a Federal Skilled Worker.

valid job offer has to be:

  • for continuous, paid, full-time work (minimum of 30 hours/week) that is:
    • not seasonal
    • for at least 1 year
  • in an occupation listed as Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A or B of the NOC.

We must be convinced that:

  • you’re able to do the job offered to you
  • you’ll be able to become licensed or certified when in Canada (if the occupation is regulated in Canada)

To get 10 points for a valid job offer, 1 of these situations must also apply.

Situation 1

You currently work in Canada on a work permit and you meet all of the following conditions:

  • Your work permit is valid both when you apply and when the permanent resident visa is issued (or you’re allowed to work in Canada without a work permit when your visa is issued).
  • We issued your work permit based on a positive Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) from Employment and Social Development Canada in an occupation listed under skill type 0 or skill level A or B of the NOC.
  • You’re working for an employer named on your work permit.
  • That employer has made a valid job offer based on you being accepted as a skilled worker.

Situation 2

You currently work in Canada in a job that is exempt from the LMIA requirement because of 1 of the following:

  • an international agreement (such as, the North American Free Trade Agreement) or
  • significant benefit to Canadian interests or
  • a federal-provincial agreement

You must also meet all of the following conditions:

  • Your work permit is valid both when you apply and when the permanent resident visa is issued (or you’re allowed to work in Canada without a permit when your permanent resident visa is issued).
  • Your current employer has made a valid job offer based on you being accepted as a skilled worker.
  • You are currently working for the employer specified on your work permit.
  • You have been working for that employer for at least 1 year, continuous full-time or part-time equivalent.

Situation 3

You must meet all of the following conditions:

  • You currently don’t have a work permit, or don’t plan to work in Canada before you get a permanent resident visa.
  • An employer has a LMIA.
  • That employer has made you a valid job offer based on that LMIA and on you being accepted as a skilled worker.

Situation 4

You must meet all of the following conditions:

  • You have a valid work permit or are allowed to work in Canada without a work permit.
  • You’re currently working in Canada in a job that is exempt from a LMIA, but it is not under an international, federal-provincial agreement or because of significant benefit to Canadian interests.
  • An employer other than the one you are currently working for:
    • has a LMIA
    • has made you a valid job offer based on that LMIA and on you being accepted as a skilled worker.

LMIAs and valid job offers

  • You can’t get a LMIA (your employer must do this for you).
  • Employment and Social Development Canada will only confirm valid job offers for occupations listed in skill type 0, or skill level A or B, of the NOC.

Adaptability (maximum 10 points)

You and your spouse or common-law partner who will immigrate with you to Canada can earn points for adaptability.

You and your spouse can earn a maximum of 10 points by combining any of the elements below. These elements assess how well you and your spouse are likely to settle in Canada.

Adaptability Maximum 10 points
Your spouse or partner’s language levelYour spouse or common-law partner has a language level in either English or French at CLB 4 level or higher in all 4 language abilities (speaking, listening, reading and writing).

 

To get these points, you must submit your spouse or common-law partner’s test results from an approved agency when you apply. The language tests are valid for 2 years after the date of the test result. They must be valid on the day you apply for permanent residence.

5
Your past studies in CanadaYou completed at least 2 academic years of full-time study (in a program at least 2 years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada.

 

Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week. You must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time.

5
Your spouse or partner’s past studies in CanadaYour spouse or common-law partner completed at least 2 academic years of full-time study (in a program at least 2 years long) at a secondary or post-secondary school in Canada.

 

Full-time study means at least 15 hours of classes per week, and your spouse or partner must have stayed in good academic standing (as set out by the school) during that time.

5
Your past work in CanadaYou did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada:

 

  1. In a job listed in Skill Type 0 or Skill Levels A or B of the National Occupational Classification (NOC).
  2. And, with a valid work permit, or while authorized to work in Canada.
10
Your spouse or common-law partner’s past work in CanadaYour spouse or partner did at least 1 year of full-time work in Canada on a valid work permit or while authorized to work in Canada. 5
Arranged employment in CanadaYou earned points for having arranged employment. 5
Relatives in CanadaYou, or your spouse or common-law partner, have a relative who is:

 

  • living in Canada
  • 18 years or older and
  • a Canadian citizen or permanent resident

This relative must be a:

  • parent
  • grandparent
  • child
  • grandchild
  • your or your spouse’s sibling (child of your or your spouse’s parent)
  • your or your spouse’s aunt or uncle (by blood or marriage)
  • your or your spouse’s niece or nephew (grandchild of your or your spouse’s parent)
5
fswp proof of funds
 
Canada’s Multi-Year Immigration Plan 2018 to 2020

The following table represents the government of Canada’s Multi-Year Immigration Plan beginning 2018 and ending in 2020. This table includes a comparison with 2017 targets.

To find out if you are eligible for one of these Canadian immigration programs, please fill out a free assessment form.

Category Immigration Program 2017 Target 2018 2019 2020 Percentage change, 2017 to 2020
Economic Programs   Range Target Range Target Range Target  
FSW, FST, CEC 71,700 72,700-78,200 74,900 76,000- 83,000 81,400 81,000-88,000 85,800 +19.66%
Atlantic Pilot Program 2,000 500- 2,000 1,000 1,000-4,000 2,000 2,000-4,000 4,000 +100%
Caregivers 18,000 15,000-20,000 17,000 9,500-15,500 14,000 4,000-7,000 5,000 -72.22%
Business 500 500-1,000 700 500-1,500 700 500-1,500 700 +40%
Provincial Nominee Programs 51,000 53,000-57,400 55,000 57,000-63,500 61,000 62,000-68,500 67,800 +32.94%
Quebec Skilled Worker Program and Quebec Business 29,300 27,900-29,900 28,900 31,500-33,500 32,500 31,500- 33,500 32,500 +10.92%
All Economic Programs 172,500  169,600– 188,500 177,500 175,500201,000 191,600 181,000-202,500 195,800 +13.51
 Percentage of overall: 57.25% Percentage of overall: 58.06%   Percentage of overall: 57.59%
Family Class Programs Spouses, Partners and Dependent Children 64,000 64,000-68,000 66,000  64,000- 70,000 68,000 64,000-74,000 70,000 +9.37%
Parents and Grandparents 20,000 17,000-21,000 20,000  18,000-21,000  20,500  18,000-22,000 21,000 +5%
All Family Class Programs 84,000 81,00089,000 86,000  82,00091,000  88,500  82,00096,000 91,000 +8.3%
Percentage of overall:  27.74% Percentage of overall: 26.81%   Percentage of overall: 26.77%
 
Refugees and Protected Persons Protected Persons in Canada and Dependents Abroad 7,500 13,500-17,000 16,000 14,000- 20,000 16,500 16,000-20,000 17,000 +126.67%
Privately-Sponsored Refugees 16,000  16,000-20,000 18,000 17,000-21,000 19,000 18,000-23,000 20,000 +25%
Blended Visa Office Referred 1,500  1,000-3,000 1,500 1,000-3,000 1,650 1,000-3,000 1,700 +13.33%
Government-Assisted Refugees 15,000  6,000-8,000 7,500 7,000-9,000 8,500 8,500-10,500 10,000 -33.33%
All Refugees and Protected Persons 40,000  36,50048,000 43,000 39,00053,000 45,650 43,50056,500 48,700 +21.75%
Percentage of overall: 13.87% Percentage of overall: 13.83%   Percentage of overall: 14.32 %
 
Humanitarian and Other All Humanitarian and Other 3,500 2,900– 4,500 3,500 3,5005,000 4,250 3,5005,000 4,500 +28.57%
Percentage of overall: 1.13% Percentage of overall: 1.29%   Percentage of overall:  1.32%
    Total Admission Targets for all immigration categories in 2018: 310,000   Total Admission Targets for all immigration categories in 2019:

 

330,000

     Total Admission Targets for all immigration categories in 2020:

 

340,000

Total Admission Targets for all immigration categories in 2018-2020 Immigration Levels Plan: 980,000
 

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